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E.g., 11/22/2017
E.g., 11/22/2017
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  • graphic of an evidence hierarchy
  • skin
  • Artificial insulin-secreting cells
Your search has returned 2129 articles:
  • Context

    Philosophical critique exposes flaws in medical evidence hierarchies

    Immanuel Kant was famous for writing critiques.

    He earned his status as the premier philosopher of modern times with such works as Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Practical Reason and Critique of Judgment. It might have been helpful for medical science if he had also written a critique of evidence.

    Scientific research supposedly provides reliable evidence for physicians to...

    11/13/2017 - 14:30 Science & Society, Clinical Trials, Biomedicine
  • News

    Scientists replaced 80 percent of a ‘butterfly’ boy’s skin

    In a last-ditch effort to save a dying 7-year-old boy, scientists have used stem cells and gene therapy to replace about 80 percent of his skin.

    This procedure’s success demonstrates that the combination therapy may be effective against some rare genetic skin disorders. The study also sheds light on how the skin replenishes itself, researchers report November 8 in Nature.

    In 2015,...

    11/08/2017 - 13:35 Genetics, Cells, Biomedicine
  • News

    Artificial insulin-releasing cells may make it easier to manage diabetes

    Artificial cells made from scratch in the lab could one day offer a more effective, patient-friendly diabetes treatment.

    Diabetes, which affects more than 400 million people around the world, is characterized by the loss or dysfunction of insulin-making beta cells in the pancreas. For the first time researchers have created synthetic cells that mimic how natural beta cells sense blood...

    11/03/2017 - 12:00 Biomedicine, Technology
  • News

    Zika hasn’t been in the news much, but that doesn’t mean it’s gone

    Less than a year after the World Health Organization declared Zika is no longer a public health emergency, the virus seems to have fallen from public consciousness, at least outside of heavily affected areas. The mosquito-borne virus staged a massive assault on the Western Hemisphere in 2015 and 2016 (SN: 12/24/16, p. 19), but this year, Zika appears to be in retreat.

    ...
    10/30/2017 - 07:00 Health, Biomedicine
  • News

    This stretchy implant could help kids avoid repeated open-heart surgeries

    A new stretchy prosthetic could reduce the number of surgeries that children with leaking heart valves must undergo.

    The device, a horseshoe-shaped implant that wraps around the base of a heart valve to keep it from leaking, is described online October 10 in Nature Biomedical Engineering. In adults, a rigid ring is used, but it can’t be implanted in children because it would constrict...

    10/17/2017 - 11:58 Technology, Biomedicine, Health
  • News

    A potential drug found in a sea creature can now be made efficiently in the lab

    A seaweed-like marine invertebrate contains a molecule that has piqued interest as a drug but is in short supply: Collecting 14 tons of the critters, a type of bryozoan, yields just 18 grams of the potential medicine. Now, an efficient lab recipe might make bryostatin 1 easier to get.

    Making more of the molecule could help scientists figure out whether the drug — which has shown mixed...

    10/12/2017 - 17:47 Chemistry, Biomedicine, Clinical Trials
  • Feature

    Luhan Yang strives to make pig organs safe for human transplants

    Luhan Yang, 31BiologisteGenesis

    Biologist Luhan Yang dreams of pig organs that will one day fly — into people. If she has her way, animal farms will raise herds of bioengineered pigs, designed to produce kidneys, livers and other organs that could be transplanted into humans. Animal parts would slip seamlessly into people, easing their suffering.

    “There are millions of patients worldwide...

    10/04/2017 - 13:44 Biomedicine, Cells, Genetics
  • For Daily Use

    Six in seven contact lens wearers take unnecessary risks with their eyes

    People in the United States who wear contact lenses share an eye-opening characteristic. Roughly 85 percent report regularly taking at least one risk when wearing or cleaning their lenses. In the Aug. 18 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describe results from a 2016 national survey of more than 6,000 people.

    Contrary...

    10/03/2017 - 12:00 Biomedicine, Science & Society
  • Science Ticker

    Body clock mechanics wins U.S. trio the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine

    Discoveries about the clocklike ups and downs of daily life have won Jeffery C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.

    Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of hormones, gene activity and other biological processes that govern sleep, body temperature and metabolism. When thrown out of whack, there can be serious health consequences, including...

    10/02/2017 - 06:41 Physiology, Biomedicine
  • News

    From day one, a frog’s developing brain is calling the shots

    Frog brains get busy long before they’re fully formed. Just a day after fertilization, embryonic brains begin sending signals to far-off places in the body, helping oversee the layout of complex patterns of muscles and nerve fibers. And when the brain is missing, bodily chaos ensues, researchers report online September 25 in Nature Communications.

    The results, from brainless embryos and...

    09/25/2017 - 05:00 Biomedicine, Animals, Neuroscience