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E.g., 03/18/2019
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Your search has returned 653 articles:
  • News

    No, we don’t know that gum disease causes Alzheimer’s

    Do you floss regularly? A study published January 23 in Science Advances — and the news stories that it inspired — might have scared you into better oral hygiene by claiming to find a link between gum bacteria and Alzheimer’s disease.

    Those experiments hinted that the gum disease–causing bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis was present in the brains of a small number of people who died with...

    01/31/2019 - 07:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    Rocking puts adults to sleep faster and makes slumber deeper

    Babies love to be rocked to sleep. It turns out that we never quite grow out of it.

    Grown-ups tucked into a gently swaying bed for the night fell asleep faster and slept deeper, scientists report in the Feb. 4 Current Biology. What’s more, these rocked adults had sharper memories the next morning. Aside from hinting at the next great sleep aid, the results offer clues about how the brain...

    01/24/2019 - 11:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    The cerebellum may do a lot more than just coordinate movement

    Its name means “little brain” in Latin, but the cerebellum is anything but. The fist-sized orb at the back of the brain has an outsized role in social interactions, a study in mice suggests.Once thought to be a relatively simple brain structure that had only one job, coordinating movement, the cerebellum is gaining recognition for being an important mover and shaker in the brain.

    Early...

    01/23/2019 - 07:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    New ways to image and control nerve cells could unlock brain mysteries

    Using laser light, ballooning tissue and innovative genetic tricks, scientists are starting to force brains to give up their secrets.

    By mixing and matching powerful advances in microscopy and cell biology, researchers have imaged intricate details of individual nerve cells in fruit flies and mice, and even controlled small groups of nerve cells in living mice.

    The techniques,...

    01/17/2019 - 14:00 Neuroscience, Technology
  • News

    Nerve cells from people with autism grow unusually big and fast

    Young nerve cells derived from people with autism are precocious, growing bigger and developing sooner than cells taken from people without autism, a new study shows.

    The results, described January 7 in Nature Neuroscience, hint that in some cases nerve cells veer off course early in brain development to ultimately cause the disorder.

    As a proxy of brain growth, researchers led by...

    01/11/2019 - 06:00 Neuroscience
  • Year in Review

    The battle over new nerve cells in adult brains intensifies

    Just a generation ago, common wisdom held that once a person reaches adulthood, the brain stops producing new nerve cells. Scientists countered that depressing prospect 20 years ago with signs that a grown-up brain can in fact replenish itself. The implications were huge: Maybe that process would offer a way to fight disorders such as depression and Alzheimer’s disease.

    This year,...

    12/20/2018 - 07:00 Neuroscience
  • Year in Review

    Zapping the spinal cord helped paralyzed people learn to move again

    The spinal cord can make a comeback.

    Intensive rehabilitation paired with electric stimulation of the spinal cord allowed six paralyzed people to walk or take steps years after their injuries, three small studies published this year showed.

    “There’s a capacity here of human spinal circuitry to be able to regain significant motor control and function,” says Susan Harkema, a...

    12/17/2018 - 08:19 Neuroscience
  • News

    Big data reveals hints of how, when and where mental disorders start

    Psychiatric disorders’ many complexities have stymied scientists looking for clear genetic culprits. But a new giant dataset holds clues to how, when and where these brain disorders begin.

    Called PsychENCODE, the project’s first large data release has revealed intricate insights into the behavior of genes and the stretches of genetic material between them in both healthy brains and those...

    12/13/2018 - 14:49 Neuroscience, Genetics
  • News in Brief

    Here’s a rare way that an Alzheimer’s protein can spread

    An Alzheimer’s protein found in contaminated vials of human growth hormone can spread in the brains of mice. That finding, published online December 13 in Nature, adds heft to the idea that, in very rare cases, amyloid-beta can travel from one person’s brain to another’s.

    Decades ago, over a thousand young people in the United Kingdom received injections of growth hormone derived from...

    12/13/2018 - 11:00 Neuroscience
  • Feature

    A gut-brain link for Parkinson’s gets a closer look

    Martha Carlin married the love of her life in 1995. She and John Carlin had dated briefly in college in Kentucky, then lost touch until a chance meeting years later at a Dallas pub. They wed soon after and had two children. John worked as an entrepreneur and stay-at-home dad. In his free time, he ran marathons.

    Almost eight years into their marriage, the pinky finger on John’s right hand...

    12/07/2018 - 09:00 Health, Neuroscience, Microbiology