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  • four cups of coffee
  • mouse embryonic stem cells
  • at home tests for telomere length
Your search has returned 230 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Here’s how drinking coffee could protect your heart

    Coffee revs up cell’s energy factories and helps hearts recover from heart attacks, a study of mice suggests.

    In the study, researchers gave mice the equivalent of four cups of coffee a day for 10 days before inducing heart attacks in the rodents. Cells in mice that got caffeine repaired the heart attack damage better than cells in mice that didn’t get caffeine, researchers report June...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells, Physiology
  • News

    It may take a village (of proteins) to turn on genes

    Turning on genes may work like forming a flash mob.

    Inside a cell’s nucleus, fast-moving groups of floppy proteins crowd together around gene control switches and coalesce into droplets to turn on genes, Ibrahim Cissé of MIT and colleagues report June 21 in two papers in Science.

    Researchers have previously demonstrated that proteins form such droplets in the cytoplasm, the cell’s...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells
  • Soapbox

    At-home telomere testing is not a reliable marker of aging, researcher says

    Stay younger, longer. Great idea. But direct-to-consumer test kits that promise to gauge a person’s biological age by analyzing a drop of blood are not worth the $100 or so investment, says oncologist Mary Armanios. The tests measure the length of telomeres, the bits of DNA that cap and protect the ends of chromosomes. But the consumer tests are unreliable and can be misinterpreted, Armanios...

    06/07/2018 - 10:00 Health, Genetics, Cells
  • News

    Your blood type might make you more likely to get traveler’s diarrhea

    E. coli has a type and it isn’t pretty. The bacterium is more likely to cause severe diarrhea in people with type A blood.

    An illness-causing strain of E. coli secretes a protein that gloms onto the sugar molecules that decorate type A blood cells, but not type B or O cells. These sugar molecules also decorate cells lining the intestines of people with type A blood and appear to provide...

    05/17/2018 - 12:00 Microbiology, Health, Cells
  • 50 years ago, starving tumors of oxygen proposed as weapon in cancer fight

    Starve the tumor, not the cell

    Animal experiments demonstrate for the first time that transplanted tumors release a chemical into the host’s bloodstream that causes the host to produce blood vessels to supply the tumor.… If such a factor can be identified in human cancers … it might be possible to prevent the vascularization of tumors. Since tumors above a certain small size require...

    05/04/2018 - 11:00 Cancer, Biomedicine, Cells
  • News

    An enzyme involved in cancer and aging gets a close-up

    Like a genetic handyman, an elusive enzyme deep inside certain cells repairs the tips of chromosomes, which fray as cells divide. It’s prized by rapidly dividing cells – like stem cells and tumor cells – and by scientists on the hunt for cancer and other disease therapies.

    Now researchers have the best picture yet of this enzyme, called telomerase. Using cryo-electron microscopy,...

    05/04/2018 - 10:00 Health, Cells, Cancer
  • News

    This is how norovirus invades the body

    How a nasty, contagious stomach virus lays claim to the digestive system just got a little less mysterious.  

    In mice, norovirus infects rare cells in the lining of the gut called tuft cells. Like beacons in a dark sea, these cells glowed with evidence of a norovirus infection in fluorescent microscopy images, researchers report in the April 13 Science.

    If norovirus also targets...

    04/13/2018 - 10:23 Health, Cells
  • News

    Human brains make new nerve cells — and lots of them — well into old age

    Your brain might make new nerve cells well into old age.

    Healthy people in their 70s have just as many young nerve cells, or neurons, in a memory-related part of the brain as do teenagers and young adults, researchers report in the April 5 Cell Stem Cell. The discovery suggests that the hippocampus keeps generating new neurons throughout a person’s life.

    The finding contradicts a...

    04/05/2018 - 14:50 Neuroscience, Human Development, Cells
  • News in Brief

    A fake organ mimics what happens in the blink of an eye

    AUSTIN, Texas — A new artificial organ gives a new meaning to the phrase “making eyes.”

    For the first time, researchers used human cells to build a model of the surface of the eye that’s equipped with a fake eyelid that mimics blinking. This synthetic eye could be used to study and test treatments for eye diseases, researchers reported February 16 in a news conference at the annual...

    02/20/2018 - 17:15 Biophysics, Technology, Cells
  • Science Visualized

    Here’s how cells rapidly stuff two meters of DNA into microscopic capsules

    Frequent fliers, take note. Scientists have figured out how cells quickly pack long chromosomes into compact, organized bundles — a key step before cells divide. The new finding unifies two competing ideas about the process: whether it involves winding chromosomes into a spiral staircase or into a set of loops. It turns out cells use two different ring-shaped proteins called condensins to do...

    01/29/2018 - 16:30 Cells, Genetics