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E.g., 06/17/2019
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  • News

    Is a long-dormant Russian volcano waking up? It’s complicated

    Seismic rumbles beneath a long-dormant volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula could herald an imminent eruption, a team of scientists says. But other researchers say that the observed seismic activity could be related to already erupting volcanoes in the region.

    Fewer than 10,500 people live within 100 kilometers of the volcano, called Bolshaya Udina, making a catastrophic eruption that...

    06/17/2019 - 06:00 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Table salt may be hiding in Europa’s underground sea

    What flavors our food may also season the sea of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

    Sulfate salts were thought to lurk in the watery ocean under the moon’s icy crust. But data from the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that common table salt dominates the sea’s chemistry, researchers report June 12 in Science Advances.

    “This could mean that the ocean chemistry is more similar to what we’re used...

    06/14/2019 - 11:02 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News

    Many of the world’s rivers are flush with dangerous levels of antibiotics

    In a massive survey of rivers across 72 countries, researchers found antibiotics at 66 percent of 711 sites sampled. Many of the most drug-polluted waterways were in Asia and Africa, where there hadn’t been much data until now.

    Environmental pollution from antibiotics is one driver of microbial drug resistance, which threatens public health. People should be as concerned about resistance...

    06/14/2019 - 09:00 Ecosystems, Pollution, Sustainability
  • News

    Massive superflares have been seen erupting from stars like the sun

    ST. LOUIS — It isn’t only young stars that spit high-energy superflares. Older stars, such as the sun, can also send out bursts of energy that could be powerful enough to strip away planetary atmospheres in close orbit, researchers report.

    Such superflares can be seen from hundreds of light-years away. Astrophysicists had assumed that only young stars had these outbursts. But a team of...

    06/14/2019 - 07:00 Astronomy
  • Growth Curve

    When fighting lice, focus on kids’ heads, not hats or toys

    I recently attempted a technically demanding “around the world” braid on my kindergartner. On my sloppy and meandering approach to the South Pole, I discovered a loathsome sight that scuttled my circumnavigation — a smattering of small, brownish casings stuck onto hairs.

    I tried to convince myself that I was looking at sand. She’s always covered in sand! But I’ve spent enough time around...

    06/13/2019 - 08:00 Parenting, Health, Guidelines
  • News in Brief

    Some Canadian lakes still store DDT in their mud

    Five decades after DDT was last sprayed across Canadian forests, this harmful pesticide can still be found at the bottom of several lakes.

    Researchers analyzed sediment from five lakes in New Brunswick, Canada, where airplanes spewed DDT to combat spruce budworm outbreaks before the insecticide was phased out circa 1970. Millions of kilograms of DDT were sprayed across the province,...

    06/13/2019 - 06:01 Pollution, Ecosystems
  • News

    The National Weather Service has launched its new U.S. forecasting model

    The National Weather Service has launched a powerful new weather forecasting model, just in time for the U.S. Atlantic hurricane season. But some meteorologists worry that, even after years of testing, the model is still not ready for prime time.

    Over the last year, the weather service has been testing the upgraded tool, using it to do retrospective forecasts of three hurricane seasons...

    06/12/2019 - 15:11 Climate
  • News

    People may have smoked marijuana in rituals 2,500 years ago in western China

    Mourners gathered at a cemetery in what’s now western China around 2,500 years ago to inhale fumes of burning cannabis plants that wafted from small wooden containers. High levels of the psychoactive compound THC in those ignited plants, also known as marijuana, would have induced altered states of consciousness. 

    Evidence of this practice comes from Jirzankal Cemetery in Central Asia’s...

    06/12/2019 - 14:01 Archaeology, Plants
  • News in Brief

    Bats beat out dogs as the main cause of rabies deaths in the U.S.

    In the United States, the landscape of rabies transmission has shifted over the last 80 years. 

    Rabies deaths linked to dog bites and scratches have dropped, and those from wild animals now carry a greater share of the blame. Bats cause roughly 70 percent of deaths in Americans infected with rabies, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says in a report released June 12....

    06/12/2019 - 13:14 Animals, Health
  • News in Brief

    Astronomers may have spotted the ghost galaxy that hit the Milky Way long ago

    The Milky Way survived a galactic hit and run millions of years ago — and astronomers may have finally found the culprit. 

    Ten years ago, astrophysicists Sukanya Chakrabarti and Leo Blitz of the University of California, Berkeley, suggested that ripples in the outer gas disk of the Milky Way were caused by a collision with a dwarf galaxy that shook the Milky Way’s gas like a pebble...

    06/12/2019 - 12:00 Astronomy