Search Content | Science News

Support Science Journalism

Science News is a nonprofit.

Support us by subscribing now.

Search Content

E.g., 04/23/2019
E.g., 04/23/2019
Your search has returned 7078 images:
  • black newborn
  • neutrophils
  • Trichomonas vaginalis
Your search has returned 111212 articles:
  • News

    Medicaid expansion may help shrink health gaps between black and white babies

    Black babies in the United States are twice as likely as white infants to be born at low birth weight, and 1.5 times as likely to be born prematurely. But states that expanded Medicaid health care coverage as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act may be shrinking that racial health gap, a study finds.

    Researchers analyzed birth certificate data in 18 states plus Washington, D.C., that had...

    04/23/2019 - 11:05 Human Development, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘An Elegant Defense’ explores the immune system’s softer side

    An Elegant DefenseMatt RichtelWilliam Morrow, $28.99

    We like to think of the immune system as our own personal military, ready to attack foreign invaders. Slice your finger, and immune cells rush in to destroy rogue pathogens.

    But it’s misleading to think of the immune system as solely a war machine. It must also keep the peace, assessing each threat and, in many cases,...

    04/23/2019 - 08:00 Immune Science, History of Science
  • Feature

    How an obscure sexually transmitted parasite tangos with the immune system

    Frances Mercer runs a fight club.

    In one corner, the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis, which causes a widespread sexually transmitted infection that many people have never heard of. In the other corner are neutrophils, the immune system cells best equipped to take down the aggressor.

    Watching the two battle it out, Mercer, an immunoparasitologist at California State Polytechnic...

    04/23/2019 - 06:00 Biomedicine
  • News in Brief

    Mercury has a massive solid inner core

    The smallest planet in our solar system has a massive solid inner core.

    In its final trip around Mercury before crash-landing in 2015, NASA’s MESSENGER mission zoomed in close to the planet, enabling scientists to make detailed measurements of its gravity, spin and internal structure. Those data, researchers report April 10 in Geophysical Research Letters, suggest Mercury has a solid...

    04/22/2019 - 09:58 Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Ancient sculptors made magnetic figures from rocks struck by lightning

    People living at least 2,000 years ago near the Pacific Coast of what’s now Guatemala crafted massive human sculptures with magnetized foreheads, cheeks and navels. New research provides the first detailed look at how these sculpted body parts were intentionally placed within magnetic fields on large rocks.

    Lightning strikes probably magnetized sections of boulders that were later carved...

    04/22/2019 - 08:00 Archaeology
  • News

    The M87 black hole image showed the best way to measure black hole masses

    The measure of a black hole is what it does with its stars.

    That’s one lesson astronomers are taking from the first-ever picture of a black hole, released on April 10 by an international telescope team (SN Online: 4/10/19). That image confirmed that the mass of the supermassive black hole in the center of galaxy M87 is close to what astronomers expected from how nearby stars orbit —...

    04/22/2019 - 06:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • Feature

    When anxiety happens as early as preschool, treatments can help

    When Molly was 10 months old, her parents took her to a Halloween party with other young families. While the other babies explored their surroundings, Molly sat and watched. She’s always been cautious, says Molly’s mom, Rachel. Early on, though, the little girl’s shyness didn’t raise red flags.

    By the time Molly turned 4, however, life was getting harder — for everyone. Even though she...

    04/21/2019 - 06:00 Psychology, Mental Health, Neuroscience, Clinical Trials
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Invisible Women’ spotlights a gaping and dangerous gender data gap

    Invisible WomenCaroline Criado PerezAbrams Press, $27

    The recent cancellation of the first all-female spacewalk occurred after the publication of Caroline Criado Perez’s Invisible Women. But the news — the lack of enough space suits for the women, suits which weren’t designed for the shape of women’s bodies in the first place — would fit right in to Criado Perez’s scathing takedown...

    04/19/2019 - 10:31 Science & Society, Health
  • The Science Life

    A scientist used chalk in a box to show that bats use sunsets to migrate

    When it comes to migration science, birds rule. Although many mammals — antelopes, whales, bats — migrate, too, scientists know far less about how those animals do it. But a new device, invented by animal navigation researcher Oliver Lindecke, could open a new way to test how far-ranging bats find their way.

    Lindecke, of Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Germany, has...

    04/19/2019 - 08:00 Animals
  • News

    The herbal supplement kratom comes with risks

    Kratom, an herbal supplement available at vape shops and online stores, has been linked to 91 deaths over 18 months from July 2016 to December 2017, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Those deaths made up less than 1 percent of the 27,338 overdose fatalities analyzed for the report, released online on April 12. Although small, the numbers point to...

    04/19/2019 - 06:00 Neuroscience, Health