Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 12/17/2017
E.g., 12/17/2017
Your search has returned 583 images:
  • Fracking well
  • football players colliding
  • 1-month-old baby with microcephaly
Your search has returned 749 articles:
  • News

    Fracking linked to low birth weight in Pennsylvania babies

    Living near a fracking site appears to be detrimental to infant health, a study eyeing the gas production practice in Pennsylvania suggests.

    Babies of moms living within one kilometer of a hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, site in the state had a 25 percent greater chance of being born underweight than did babies whose moms lived at least three kilometers away, researchers report online...

    12/13/2017 - 17:55 Health, Pollution
  • Year in Review

    Brains of former football players showed how common traumatic brain injuries might be

    There have been hints for years that playing football might come at a cost. But a study this year dealt one of the hardest hits yet to the sport, detailing the extensive damage in football players’ brains, and not just those who played professionally.       

    In a large collection of former NFL players’ postmortem brains, nearly every sample showed signs of chronic traumatic...

    12/13/2017 - 08:26 Neuroscience, Health, Science & Society
  • Year in Review

    Zika cases are down, but researchers prepare for the virus’s return

    One of the top stories of 2016 quietly exited much of the public’s consciousness in 2017. But it’s still a hot topic among scientists and for good reasons. After Zika emerged in the Western Hemisphere, it shook the Americas, as reports of infections and devastating birth defects swept through Brazil and Colombia, eventually reaching the United States. In a welcome turn, the number of Zika...

    12/13/2017 - 08:26 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    What hospitals can do to help keep excess opioids out of communities

    To halt the misuse of opioids, it may help to slash the number of pills prescribed, a new study suggests.

    Five months after the implementation of new opioid prescription guidelines at a University of Michigan hospital, roughly 7,000 fewer pills went home with patients — a drop that might reduce the risk of accessible pills leading to substance abuse. But the opioid reduction didn’t leave...

    12/06/2017 - 17:23 Health
  • News

    Cholera pandemics are fueled by globe-trotting bacterial strains

    Cholera strains behind worldwide outbreaks of the deadly disease over the last five decades are jet-setters rather than homebodies.

    It had been proposed that these cholera epidemics were homegrown, driven by local strains of Vibrio cholerae living in aquatic ecosystems. But DNA fingerprints of the V. cholerae strains behind recent large outbreaks in Africa and Latin America were more...

    11/13/2017 - 07:00 Health
  • 50 years ago, folate deficiency was linked to birth defects

    Folic acid

    Pregnant women who do not have enough folic acid — a B vitamin — in their bodies can pass the deficiency on to their unborn children. It may lead to retarded growth and congenital malformation, according to Dr. A. Leonard Luhby…. “Folic acid deficiency in pregnant women could well constitute a public health problem of dimensions we have not originally recognized,” he says. — ...

    11/30/2017 - 07:00 Human Development, Health
  • Feature

    Scientists are seeking new strategies to fight multiple sclerosis

    James Davis used to be an avid outdoorsman. He surfed, hiked, skateboarded and rock climbed. Today, the 48-year-old from Albuquerque barely gets out of bed. He has the most severe form of multiple sclerosis, known as primary progressive MS, a worsening disease that destroys the central nervous system. Diagnosed in May 2011, Davis relied on a wheelchair within six months. He can no longer get...

    11/29/2017 - 15:30 Neuroscience, Immune Science, Health
  • News

    Testosterone may be one reason why men don’t get asthma as much as women

    Testosterone may tamp down asthma caused by inhaling pollen, dust or other airborne allergens. That’s partly why more women suffer from the lung disease than men, new research suggests.

    The male sex hormone acts on a group of immune cells that are part of the first line of the body’s defense against invaders. These cells are thought to kick-start inflammation in the lungs, which causes...

    11/28/2017 - 17:32 Health, Cells, Immune Science
  • For Daily Use

    Step away from the cookie dough. E. coli outbreaks traced to raw flour

    Eggs, long condemned for making raw cookie dough a forbidden pleasure, can stop taking all the blame. There’s another reason to resist the sweet uncooked temptation: flour.

    The seemingly innocuous pantry staple can harbor strains of E. coli bacteria that make people sick. And, while not a particularly common source of foodborne illness, flour has been implicated in two E. coli outbreaks...

    11/22/2017 - 17:00 Health, Microbes
  • News in Brief

    How dad’s stress changes his sperm

    Sperm from stressed-out dads can carry that stress from one generation to another. “But one question that really hasn’t been addressed is, ‘How do dad’s experiences actually change his germ cell?’” Jennifer Chan, a neuroendocrinologist at the University of Pennsylvania, said November 13 in Washington, D.C., at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

    Now, from a study in mice...

    11/15/2017 - 15:30 Health, Development