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E.g., 06/15/2019
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  • Europa
  • Pluto
  • farside of the moon
Your search has returned 1838 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Table salt may be hiding in Europa’s underground sea

    What flavors our food may also season the sea of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

    Sulfate salts were thought to lurk in the watery ocean under the moon’s icy crust. But data from the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that common table salt dominates the sea’s chemistry, researchers report June 12 in Science Advances.

    “This could mean that the ocean chemistry is more similar to what we’re used...

    06/14/2019 - 11:02 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News

    Icy volcanoes on Pluto may have spewed organic-rich water

    Red ice found on Pluto suggests the dwarf planet recently spewed fountains of water into space. And it hints at complex — and possibly organic — chemistry in Pluto’s salty subsurface sea, researchers report May 29 in Science Advances.

    “This was a huge surprise to all of us about Pluto,” says planetary scientist Dale Cruikshank of the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. “It...

    05/29/2019 - 14:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    China’s lunar rover may have found minerals from the moon’s mantle

    The first mission to the farside of the moon may have found bits of the moon’s interior on its surface.

    The Yutu-2 rover, deployed by the Chinese Chang’e-4 spacecraft that landed on the moon in January, detected soil that appears rich in minerals thought to make up the lunar mantle, researchers report in the May 16 Nature. Those origins, if confirmed, could offer insight into the moon’s...

    05/15/2019 - 13:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Apollo-era moonquakes reveal that the moon may be tectonically active

    The moon may still be kicking.

    Rumbles recorded decades ago by seismometers at Apollo landing sites are probably linked to young faults mapped by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, scientists say. Eight of those moonquakes occurred within 30 kilometers of fault scarps, steplike cliffs on the lunar crust that mark places where one side of a fault has thrust up or slipped down. If true,...

    05/13/2019 - 11:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Water has been found in the dust of an asteroid thought to be bone-dry

    For the first time, evidence of water has been found in a stony type of asteroid once thought to be bone-dry.

    Grains of dust from the asteroid Itokawa actually contain a surprising amount of water, two cosmochemists from Arizona State University in Tempe report May 1 in Science Advances.

    “We didn’t really expect water to be there in Itokawa at all,” says study coauthor Maitrayee...

    05/01/2019 - 14:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Skepticism grows over whether the first known exomoon exists

    Hopes that astronomers found a moon orbiting a planet outside our solar system may be slowly dimming.

    Two different groups of researchers took another look at data to search for a telltale dip in starlight that could suggest a moon was passing in front of the star Kepler 1625. Their conflicting results raise questions about whether the exomoon exists.

    “When I reanalyzed the data, I...

    04/30/2019 - 12:30 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Pictures confirm Hayabusa2 made a crater in asteroid Ryugu

    Hayabusa2 has successfully blasted a crater into the asteroid Ryugu. On April 25 Japan time, the spacecraft flew over the spot where it had dropped a projectile three weeks earlier and took pictures of the impact (SN Online: 4/5/19).

    “We have confirmed that an artificial crater was created,” JAXA, Japan’s space agency, reports based on a comparison of before and after images. “The size...

    04/26/2019 - 12:09 Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    NASA’s Mars InSight lander may have the first recording of a Marsquake

    Let’s get ready to rumble: NASA may have just captured the first recording of an earthquake on Mars. On April 6, the Mars InSight lander’s seismometer recorded a short series of howls, grumbles and pings. One of those sounds — a grumble — is probably a Marsquake, representing the first recorded sound from the interior of the Red Planet, scientists say.

    The recording, released by NASA...

    04/23/2019 - 17:59 Planetary Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ponder Opportunity’s future, animal consciousness and more

    Lost Opportunity

    NASA’s Opportunity rover explored Mars for more than a decade until a dust storm last year led to its demise, Lisa Grossman reported in “After 15 years on Mars, it’s the end of the road for Opportunity” (SN: 3/16/19, p. 7).

    Reddit users had a lot of questions about the rover, nicknamed Oppy. scazon wanted to know why the estimated life spans for Opportunity and...

    04/23/2019 - 06:15 Planetary Science, Neuroscience, Biophysics
  • News in Brief

    Mercury has a massive solid inner core

    The smallest planet in our solar system has a massive solid inner core.

    In its final trip around Mercury before crash-landing in 2015, NASA’s MESSENGER mission zoomed in close to the planet, enabling scientists to make detailed measurements of its gravity, spin and internal structure. Those data, researchers report April 10 in Geophysical Research Letters, suggest Mercury has a solid...

    04/22/2019 - 09:58 Planetary Science