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Your search has returned 227 articles:
  • News

    Bird poop helps keep coral reefs healthy, but rats are messing that up

    When invasive rats chow down on island seabirds, coral reefs suffer.

    Researchers studied islands with and without the rodents in the Chagos Archipelago in the Indian Ocean. On rat-free isles, there were on average 1,243 birds per hectare compared with about two birds per hectare on rat-infested islands, the team found. And these rodentless islands had healthier coral reef ecosystems. The...

    07/11/2018 - 13:02 Ecosystems, Animals, Oceans
  • News

    Underwater fiber-optic cables could moonlight as earthquake sensors

    The global network of seafloor cables may be good for more than ferrying digital communication between continents. These fiber-optic cables could also serve as underwater earthquake detectors, researchers report online June 14 in Science.

    “It’s a very exciting proposition,” says Barbara Romanowicz, a seismologist at the University of California, Berkeley and the Collège de France in...

    06/14/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Oceans, Technology
  • News

    Here’s what narwhals sound like underwater

    Narwhals are among the most elusive of whales. But for the first time, researchers have been able to eavesdrop on the creatures for days at a time as these unicorns of the sea dove, fed and socialized.

    Biologist Susanna Blackwell and colleagues listened in on the clicks, buzzes and calls of the East Greenland narwhal (Monodon monoceros). The team’s findings, published June 13 in PLOS ONE...

    06/13/2018 - 14:00 Animals, Oceans, Conservation
  • News

    Antarctica has lost about 3 trillion metric tons of ice since 1992

    Antarctica is losing ice at an increasingly rapid pace. In just the last five years, the frozen continent has shed ice nearly three times faster on average than it did over the previous 20 years.

    An international team of scientists has combined data from two dozen satellite surveys in the most comprehensive assessment of Antarctica’s ice sheet mass yet. The conclusion: The frozen...

    06/13/2018 - 13:23 Climate, Earth, Oceans
  • News

    Tropical cyclones have slowed over the last 70 years

    Tropical cyclones don’t move as fast as they used to.

    The fierce, swirling storms move 10 percent slower, on average, than they did nearly 70 years ago, a new study finds. Such lingering storms can potentially cause more damage by dumping even more rainfall on land beneath them.

    Atmospheric scientist James Kossin examined changes in how quickly tropical cyclones, known as...

    06/06/2018 - 13:34 Climate, Oceans
  • News

    The Chicxulub asteroid impact might have set off 100,000 years of global warming

    After a giant asteroid hit Earth about 66 million years ago, the planet’s climate went on a roller coaster ride.

    The space rock’s impact set off tsunamis and wildfires before climate-chilling clouds of sulfur gas engulfed the planet for decades, wiping out most life (SN: 11/25/17, p. 14). As these clouds dissipated, billions of tons of carbon dioxide, which spewed into the atmosphere...

    05/24/2018 - 15:13 Paleontology, Oceans, Climate
  • News

    Bull sharks and bottlenose dolphins are moving north as the ocean warms

    Far from their usual tropical waters, some 200 bottlenose dolphins and about 70 false killer whales have been spotted off the western coast of Canada’s Vancouver Island. Over on the Atlantic coast, bull sharks have turned a North Carolina estuary into a nursery — a sight more familiar in Florida, until now.

    Two new studies highlight the unusual northern sightings of these three ocean...

    05/02/2018 - 11:52 Climate, Oceans, Animals, Ecosystems
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘The Curious Life of Krill’ is an ode to an underappreciated crustacean

    The Curious Life of Krill Stephen NicolIsland Press, $30

    Stephen Nicol is here to change your mind about krill: They’re not microscopic and they’re far from boring. The biologist is so sick of people misunderstanding his study subjects that he’s even gotten a (slightly botched) krill tattooed on his arm to help enlighten strangers.

    In The Curious Life of Krill, Nicol is taking...

    04/29/2018 - 08:00 Animals, Oceans, Ecosystems
  • News

    Masses of shrimp and krill may play a huge role in mixing oceans

    When it comes to tiny ocean swimmers, the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts. Ocean turbulence stirred up by multitudes of creatures such as krill can be powerful enough to extend hundreds of meters down into the deep, a new study suggests.

    Brine shrimp moving vertically in two different laboratory tanks created small eddies that aggregated into a jet roughly the size of the...

    04/18/2018 - 13:20 Oceans, Ecology
  • News

    Cargo ships must cut their emissions in half by 2050

    A new, hard-fought international deal will set limits on greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping for the first time.

    Delegates to the United Nations’ International Maritime Organization, or IMO, met for a week in London to hash out the details of the plan. On April 13, more than 170 states agreed to the new road map, which aims to reduce shipping emissions at least 50...

    04/13/2018 - 17:47 Climate, Oceans