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  • Akkermansia bacteria
  • two photos of fetal lambs in artificial wombs
  • distance runner
Your search has returned 4335 articles:
  • News

    Boosting a gut bacterium helps mice fight an ALS-like disease

    A friendly gut bacterium can help lessen ALS symptoms, a study of mice suggests.

    Mice that develop a degenerative nerve disease similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, fared better when bacteria making vitamin B3 were living in their intestines, researchers report July 22 in Nature. Those results suggest that gut microbes may make molecules that can slow...

    07/22/2019 - 11:00 Neuroscience, Cells, Biomedicine
  • 50 years ago, lambs survived but didn’t thrive inside artificial wombs

    Watching the unborn —

    An artificial womb has been used to keep some 35 fetal lambs alive for up to 55 hours … researchers [still] have to show that a fetus can actually grow, not just survive, in their man-made womb…. Eventually, it might be possible to place extremely premature infants into such a womb … to support them until they can survive on their own. — Science News, July 5,...

    07/18/2019 - 07:00 Biomedicine, Technology
  • News

    Gut microbes might help elite athletes boost their physical performance

    One difference between elite athletes and the rest of us might be in what hangs out in their guts.

    Microbes that flourished in the guts of some runners after a marathon boosted the time that lab mice ran on a treadmill, researchers report June 24 in Nature Medicine. These particular microbes seem to take lactate, pumped out by muscles during exercise, and turn it into a compound that may...

    06/24/2019 - 11:00 Microbes, Biomedicine, Microbiology
  • Feature

    New approaches may help solve the Lyme disease diagnosis dilemma

    In 2005, Rachel Straub was a college student returning home from a three-week medical service mission in Central America. Soon after, she suffered a brutal case of the flu. Or so she thought.

     “We were staying in orphanages,” she says of her trip to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. “There were bugs everywhere. I remember going to the bathroom and the sinks would be solid bugs.” She plucked at...

    06/23/2019 - 07:00 Biomedicine, Microbes, Immune Science
  • Editor's Note

    Science hasn’t managed to span the diagnosis gap

    Star Trek’s Dr. McCoy had no problem finding out what ailed his patients. He simply waved a handheld scanner over them, and the tricorder spat out a diagnosis — even if the patient was a Romulan.

    Earthbound diagnostics haven’t yet measured up to the extragalactic version, alas. Go to the doctor, and it’s likely to take a variety of tests to come up with a diagnosis. And even then,...

    06/17/2019 - 07:00 Science & Society, Biomedicine, Immune Science
  • News

    Gut bacteria may change the way many drugs work in the body

    Prescribing the best medication may require going with a patient’s gut — or at least, the bacteria that live there.

    Anecdotal reports have revealed that some gut-dwelling microbes chemically alter oral medications, affecting how well those drugs work (SN Online: 7/19/13). But the scope of this problem has remained unclear. Now, a sweeping survey of these interactions suggests that gut...

    06/03/2019 - 11:00 Microbiology, Biomedicine, Health
  • News

    How bacteria nearly killed by antibiotics can recover — and gain resistance

    Mostly dead bacteria can sometimes be resurrected as antibiotic-resistant cells.

    A protein that pumps toxic chemicals out of E. coli bacterial cells can buy time for even nearly dead microbes to become antibiotic resistant. The protein, known as the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump, doesn’t work well enough to defeat antibiotics on its own. But it can move enough antibiotic molecules out...

    05/28/2019 - 06:00 Microbiology, Genetics, Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Measles erases the immune system’s memory

    The most iconic thing about measles is the rash — red, livid splotches that make infection painfully visible.

    But that rash, and even the fever, coughing and watery, sore eyes, are all distractions from the virus’s real harm — an all-out attack on the immune system.

    Measles silently wipes clean the immune system’s memory of past infections. In this way, the virus can cast a long...

    05/21/2019 - 06:00 Health, Biomedicine
  • News

    Vaccines may help bats fight white nose syndrome

    Oral vaccines could give wild bats a better chance at surviving white nose syndrome, the fungal disease that has ravaged bat colonies in North America. In lab tests conducted on captured little brown bats, vaccination led to fewer infected bats developing lesions and more of the bats surviving, researchers report May 1 in Scientific Reports.

    White nose syndrome, caused by the fungus...

    05/17/2019 - 07:00 Animals, Biomedicine
  • 50 years ago, scientists tried to transplant part of a human eye

    Transplants: Part of a whole eye —

    After an attempted cornea transplant failed, ophthalmologists in Houston, Tex., tried a more daring experiment to restore the vision of 54-year-old John Madden…. They transplanted an entire eye from a donor who had died of a brain tumor.… [Later, the doctor who did the surgery] announced that only the front part of the donor’s eye had been...

    05/09/2019 - 07:00 Biomedicine