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E.g., 06/19/2019
E.g., 06/19/2019
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  • wheat dew
  • dragonfish teeth
  • Earth magnetic field
Your search has returned 331 articles:
  • News in Brief

    ‘Sneezing’ plants may spread pathogens to their neighbors

    Next time you pass a wheat field on a dewy morning, you might want to say “gesundheit.”

    That’s because some sick plants can “sneeze” — shooting out tiny water droplets laden with pathogens, scientists report June 19 in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. In wheat plants infected with the fungus Puccinia triticina, coalescing dew droplets flew away from the leaves they were on and...

    06/18/2019 - 19:01 Biophysics, Plants, Fungi
  • News in Brief

    Tiny structures in dragonfish teeth turn them into invisible daggers

    In the deep sea, dragonfish lure smaller fish near their gaping jaws with beardlike attachments capped with a light. But the teeth of the pencil-sized predators don’t gleam in that glow.

    Instead, dragonfish teeth are transparent and hard to see, thanks to nanoscale structures that reduce the amount of light scattered by the teeth, researchers report June 5 in Matter.

    The clear...

    06/05/2019 - 11:00 Animals, Biophysics, Evolution
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ponder Opportunity’s future, animal consciousness and more

    Lost Opportunity

    NASA’s Opportunity rover explored Mars for more than a decade until a dust storm last year led to its demise, Lisa Grossman reported in “After 15 years on Mars, it’s the end of the road for Opportunity” (SN: 3/16/19, p. 7).

    Reddit users had a lot of questions about the rover, nicknamed Oppy. scazon wanted to know why the estimated life spans for Opportunity and...

    04/23/2019 - 06:15 Planetary Science, Neuroscience, Biophysics
  • News

    People can sense Earth’s magnetic field, brain waves suggest

    A new analysis of people’s brain waves when surrounded by different magnetic fields suggests that people have a “sixth sense” for magnetism.

    Birds, fish and some other creatures can sense Earth’s magnetic field and use it for navigation (SN: 6/14/14, p. 10). Scientists have long wondered whether humans, too, boast this kind of magnetoreception. Now, by exposing people to an Earth-...

    03/18/2019 - 13:05 Neuroscience, Biophysics
  • How Bizarre

    Some shrimp make plasma with their claws. Now a 3-D printed claw can too

    Some shrimp have a secret superpower: Snapping their claws unleashes bubbles that produce plasma and shock waves to stun prey. Now a 3-D printed replica claw has reproduced the phenomenon in the lab, scientists report March 15 in Science Advances.

    When a snapping shrimp (Alpheus formosus and related species) slams its powerful claw shut, it spews a jet of water. That fast-moving stream...

    03/15/2019 - 14:00 Biophysics
  • News in Brief

    This spider slingshots itself at extreme speeds to catch prey

    BOSTON — Tasty insects, look out: In an attempt to catch prey, a speed-demon spider launches itself and its web with about 100 times the acceleration of a cheetah.

    That makes these tiny creatures, called slingshot spiders, the fastest-moving arachnids known, scientists reported March 4 at a meeting of the American Physical Society.

    Found in the Peruvian Amazon, slingshot spiders...

    03/06/2019 - 10:19 Biophysics
  • Science Visualized

    Physics explains how pollen gets its stunning diversity of shapes

    Pollen grains sport a variety of snazzy shapes, from golf ball–like divots to prickly knobs or swirls that evoke a peppermint candy. But these myriad patterns may all be due to one simple trick of physics, scientists report in the Feb. 7 Cell.

    That trick: phase separation, in which a mixture naturally breaks up into separate parts, like cream floating to the top of milk (SN: 7/21/18, p....

    02/20/2019 - 07:00 Biophysics
  • News in Brief

    How black soldier fly larvae can demolish a pizza so fast

    It all started with the can’t-tear-your-eyes-away video of black soldier fly larvae devouring a 16-inch pizza in just two hours. Watching sped-up action of the writhing mass inspired mechanical engineer Olga Shishkov of Georgia Tech in Atlanta to see what makes these insects such champions of collective feeding.

    An individual Hermetia illucens larva doesn’t eat steadily, Shishkov found....

    02/05/2019 - 19:05 Animals, Biophysics
  • News

    How worm blobs behave like a liquid and a solid

    TAMPA, Fla. — Blobs of worms flow like a fluid, plop like a solid and fascinate scientists.

    A worm by itself is as solid as any other living animal. But a mass of aquatic California blackworms tangled together flows through a tube like a liquid. Pouring, heating and otherwise playing with blobs of worms shows that a tangled mass of them has properties of both fluids and solids, Saad...

    01/11/2019 - 13:11 Animals, Biophysics