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E.g., 06/17/2019
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  • norovirus strains
  • bat
Your search has returned 1905 articles:
  • News

    Norovirus close-ups might help fight stomach flu

    Knowing your enemy is an important principle of competition, and scientists may just have become more familiar with one nasty stomach virus.

    Closeup looks at several strains of norovirus reveal that the vomit- and diarrhea-inducing virus can come in a variety of sizes, researchers report online June 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Knobs studding the virus’s...

    06/17/2019 - 10:00 Microbiology, Microbes, Health
  • News in Brief

    Bats are the main cause of rare rabies deaths in the U.S.

    In the United States, the landscape of rabies transmission has shifted over the last 70 years. 

    Following a massive campaign to vaccinate dogs starting in 1947, rabies deaths linked to dog bites and scratches have dropped, and those from wild animals now carry a greater share of the blame. Since 1960, bats have caused 62, or roughly 70 percent, of the 89 deaths from rabies exposure that...

    06/12/2019 - 13:14 Animals, Health
  • News

    Extra fingers, often seen as useless, can offer major dexterity advantages

    An extra finger can be incredibly handy. Two people born with six fingers per hand can tie their shoes, adroitly manage phones and play a complicated video game — all with a single hand, a study shows.

    These people’s superior dexterity, described June 3 in Nature Communications, suggests that instead of being seen as aberrations that ought to be surgically removed, extra fingers can...

    06/12/2019 - 07:00 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    A tiny crater on viruses behind the common cold may be their Achilles’ heel

    A newly discovered indentation on the surface of viruses that cause many illnesses, including the common cold, could be their Achilles’ heel — and a possible target for effective drugs.

    When scientists tested antiviral compounds on cells grown in the lab, the team found one that blocked the replication of an enterovirus. Cryo-electron microscopy revealed that the compound binds to and...

    06/11/2019 - 14:00 Health
  • News in Brief

    Medicaid-expanding states had fewer cardiovascular deaths than other states

    States that expanded eligibility for Medicaid insurance coverage saw fewer deaths related to cardiovascular disease than if they hadn’t broadened the program’s reach, a new study shows. It’s another indication that Medicaid expansion, part of the Affordable Care Act, appears to be improving public health.

    Counties in states with expanded eligibility had 4.3 fewer cardiovascular-related...

    06/07/2019 - 13:00 Health
  • News

    Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C could prevent thousands of deaths in the U.S.

    Having the world meet a more stringent goal to limit global warming may prevent thousands of heat-related deaths in 15 major U.S. cities, a study shows. The projections illustrate the high risk from climate change faced by urban populations.

    Under the Paris Agreement, participating countries have pledged to curb greenhouse gas emissions with the aim of limiting warming to no more than 2...

    06/05/2019 - 14:00 Health, Climate
  • News

    Gut bacteria may change the way many drugs work in the body

    Prescribing the best medication may require going with a patient’s gut — or at least, the bacteria that live there.

    Anecdotal reports have revealed that some gut-dwelling microbes chemically alter oral medications, affecting how well those drugs work (SN Online: 7/19/13). But the scope of this problem has remained unclear. Now, a sweeping survey of these interactions suggests that gut...

    06/03/2019 - 11:00 Microbiology, Biomedicine, Health
  • News

    A fungus weaponized with a spider toxin can kill malaria mosquitoes

    A fungus engineered to produce a spider toxin could help take down insecticide-resistant mosquitoes that can spread malaria.

    In a netted, outdoor experiment in Burkina Faso, the genetically engineered fungus wiped out mosquito populations within two generations, researchers report in the May 31 Science. If the result holds up in a real-world situation, the modified fungus may one day...

    05/30/2019 - 14:00 Health, Fungi, Genetics
  • News

    Vaping the sweetener sucralose may produce toxic chemicals

    Lacing e-cigarette liquid with sucralose is probably not a sweet idea. Vaping the synthetic sweetener may generate harmful chemicals, researchers report May 13 in Chemical Research in Toxicology.

    “I would strongly advise that users should not use liquids with sucralose in them,” says Sven Jordt, a toxicologist at Duke University School of Medicine who was not involved with the study....

    05/30/2019 - 07:00 Chemistry, Health
  • Editor's Note

    Resurgence of measles is a tale as old as human history

    Late last year, researchers reported a discovery from a 5,000-year-old mass grave in Sweden: DNA from the bacterium that causes plague. The people in that grave were probably felled by an epidemic that spread via trade routes from southeastern Europe and contributed to sharp population declines across the continent (SN: 1/19/19, p. 12), a precursor to the Black Death that wiped out up...
    05/29/2019 - 15:28 Health, Immune Science, Science & Society