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E.g., 07/24/2019
E.g., 07/24/2019
Your search has returned 129 images:
  • Buzz Aldrin on the moon
  • Apollo 15 lunar module
  • an image showing several Apollo 11 anniversary books
Your search has returned 322 articles:
  • Feature

    Accolades, skepticism and science marked Science News’ coverage of Apollo

    To cover humankind’s first steps on the moon, Science News needed a backup plan.

    “We didn’t know what kind of pictures we’d get, when we would get them, who we would get them from,” says Kendrick Frazier, who joined Science News as a writer just two months before Apollo 11 touched down on lunar soil. So the staff took pictures of their home television screens during the July 20, 1969...

    07/16/2019 - 06:00 Planetary Science, History of Science, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Apollo astronauts left trash, mementos and experiments on the moon

    Once on the moon, Apollo astronauts had two major goals: get themselves and the moon rocks home safe.

    To make space on the cramped lunar modules for the hundreds of kilograms of moon samples, the astronauts had to go full Marie Kondo. Anything that wasn’t essential for the ride home got tossed: cameras, hammocks, boots and trash. Downsizing also meant abandoning big stuff, like moon...

    07/15/2019 - 06:06 Planetary Science, History of Science
  • Reviews & Previews

    Celebrate the moon landing anniversary with books that go beyond the small step

    Astronomy lovers are not the only ones excited about the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Publishers are also taking note, serving up a pile of books to mark the occasion.

    Are you looking for a general overview of the birth of the U.S. space program? Would you rather geek out on the technical details of the Apollo missions? How about flipping through a collection of photographs from...

    07/14/2019 - 06:00 Planetary Science, History of Science
  • Context

    Many fictional moon voyages preceded the Apollo landing

    From the beginning, the moon has been humankind’s perpetual nighttime companion.

    Accompanied by innumerable points of light, the moon’s luminous disk hovered overhead like a dim substitute for the sun, just with a shape not so constant. Rather the moon waxed and waned, diminishing to a barely discernible sliver before disappearing and then gradually restoring itself to fullness.

    It...

    07/11/2019 - 06:00 History of Science
  • 50 years ago, scientists wanted to build solar panels on the moon

    Solar power from moon to Earth —

    An almost unlimited supply of electricity could be generated on the moon’s surface by huge arrays of solar cells and beamed to Earth by laser. Sunlight falling on a crater … could produce from 10,000 to 100,000 megawatts of power. By comparison, a large hydroelectric dam on Earth produces about 100 megawatts. Solar cells would be more efficient on...

    06/07/2019 - 08:00 Astronomy, Technology, History of Science
  • Context

    Murray Gell-Mann gave structure to the subatomic world

    In Bernard Malamud’s The Natural, Iris (played in the movie version by Glenn Close) tells Roy Hobbs that we all have two lives, “the life we learn with and the life we live with after that.”

    Murray Gell-Mann, the Nobel laureate physicist who died Friday, May 24, at age 89, also lived two lives. But both were spent learning — about how the world works.

    In his first life Gell-Mann...

    05/24/2019 - 17:09 History of Science, Physics
  • Context

    These are the top 10 landmarks in the history of making measurements

    In no field of science is the gulf between appreciation and importance as wide as it is for metrology.

    It’s not about the weather. Metrology is the science of measuring. It has a longer history than the modern sciences taught in school, and it’s essential to all of science’s usefulness and power. Without sound metrology, there’d be no trips to the moon, no modern medicine, no self-...

    05/20/2019 - 09:00 History of Science
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘An Elegant Defense’ explores the immune system’s softer side

    An Elegant DefenseMatt RichtelWilliam Morrow, $28.99

    We like to think of the immune system as our own personal military, ready to attack foreign invaders. Slice your finger, and immune cells rush in to destroy rogue pathogens.

    But it’s misleading to think of the immune system as solely a war machine. It must also keep the peace, assessing each threat and, in many cases,...

    04/23/2019 - 08:00 Immune Science, History of Science
  • Context

    Black hole image validates imagining the unimaginable

    Black holes capture everything they encounter. From subatomic particles to stars, solids, gases, liquids and even light, everything falls irretrievably in. And even more assuredly, black holes capture the popular imagination.Thinking about space, as humans have since they first gazed at the points of light decorating the nighttime sky, triggers the mind to imagine things that cannot be...

    04/12/2019 - 06:00 History of Science, Astronomy
  • Context

    This Greek philosopher had the right idea, just too few elements

    Long before there was a periodic table of the elements, there was no need for a table — just four chairs.

    From ancient through medieval into early modern times, natural philosophers could count the known elements with the fingers of only one hand (with no need for the thumb). All material reality, nearly every authority concurred, was built from only four elements. And those four...

    04/03/2019 - 12:00 History of Science