Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Help us keep you informed.

Real Science. Real News.

Search Content

E.g., 12/15/2018
E.g., 12/15/2018
Your search has returned 6734 images:
  • tornado in Oklahoma
  • northern Australian bettong
  • harbor porpoise
Your search has returned 13 articles:
  • Reviews & Previews

    Here are our favorite science books of 2017

    Have you fallen behind on your reading this year? Or maybe you’ve plowed through your must-reads and are ready for more. Science News has got you covered. Here are the staff’s picks for some of the best science books of 2017. Find detailed reviews from previous issues in the links below or in our Editors pick: Favorite books of 2017.

    Against the GrainJames C. Scott

    Armed with...

    12/17/2017 - 07:00 Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    Resurrecting extinct species raises ethical questions

    Rise of the NecrofaunaBritt WrayGreystone Books, $26.95

    A theme park populated with re-created dinosaurs is fiction. But if a handful of dedicated scientists have their way, a park with woolly mammoths, passenger pigeons and other “de-extincted” animals could become reality.

    In Rise of the Necrofauna, writer and radio broadcaster Britt Wray presents a comprehensive look...

    10/20/2017 - 07:00 Genetics, Animals, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    The rise of agricultural states came at a big cost, a new book argues

    Against the GrainJames C. ScottYale Univ., $26

    Contrary to popular opinion, humans didn’t shed a harsh existence as hunter-gatherers and herders for the good life of stay-in-place farming. Year-round farming villages and early agricultural states, such as those that cropped up in Mesopotamia, exchanged mobile groups’ healthy lifestyles for the back-breaking drudgery of cultivating...

    10/03/2017 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Big Chicken’ chronicles the public health dangers of using antibiotics in farming

    Big ChickenMaryn McKennaNational Geographic, $27

    Journalist Maryn McKenna opens Big Chicken by teasing our taste buds with a description of the succulent roasted chickens she bought at an open-air market in Paris. The birds tasted nothing like the bland, uniform chicken offered at U.S. grocery stores. This meat had an earthy, lush, animal flavor. From this tantalizing oh-so-European...

    09/17/2017 - 08:00 Agriculture, Health, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    North America’s largest recorded earthquake helped confirm plate tectonics

    The Great QuakeHenry FountainCrown, $28

    In the early evening of March 27, 1964, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake roiled Alaska. For nearly five minutes, the ground shuddered violently in what was, and still is, the second biggest temblor in recorded history.

    Across the southern part of the state, land cracked and split, lifting some areas nearly 12 meters — about as high as a...

    09/03/2017 - 08:00 Earth, History of Science
  • Reviews & Previews

    How science has fed stereotypes about women

    InferiorAngela SainiBeacon Press, $25.95

    Early in Inferior, science writer Angela Saini recalls a man cornering her after a signing for her book Geek Nation, on science in India. “Where are all the women scientists?” he asked, then answered his own question. “Women just aren’t as good at science as men are. They’ve been shown to be less intelligent.”

    Saini fought back with a...

    08/29/2017 - 11:00 History of Science, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Making Contact’ chronicles an astronomer’s struggle to find E.T.

    Making ContactSarah ScolesPegasus Books, $27.95

    In Carl Sagan’s 1985 sci-fi novel Contact, a radio astronomer battles naysayers and funding setbacks to persist in her audacious plan — scanning the skies for signals from aliens. Sagan had real-life inspiration for his book (and the 1997 movie of the same name): astronomer Jill Tarter, who spearheaded the search for extraterrestrial...

    07/24/2017 - 16:33 Astronomy, History of Science, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    Every breath you take contains a molecule of history

    Caesar’s Last BreathSam KeanLittle, Brown and Co., $28

    Julius Caesar could have stayed home on March 15, 44 B.C. But mocking the soothsayer who had predicted his death, the emperor rode in his litter to Rome’s Forum. There he met the iron daggers of 60 senators.

    As he lay in a pool of blood, he may have gasped a final incrimination to his protégé Brutus: You too, my son? Or...

    06/25/2017 - 07:00 Chemistry, Earth, History of Science
  • Reviews & Previews

    Read up on solar eclipses before this year’s big event

    In August, the United States will experience its first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in nearly a century. Over the course of an hour and a half, the moon’s narrow shadow will slice across 12 states, from Oregon to South Carolina (SN: 8/20/16, p. 14). As many as 200 million people are expected to travel to spots where they can view the spectacle, in what could become one of the most...

    04/30/2017 - 08:00 Astronomy, History of Science
  • Reviews & Previews

    Fox experiment is replaying domestication in fast-forward

    How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog)Lee Alan Dugatkinand Lyudmila TrutUniv. of Chicago, $26

    In 1959, Lyudmila Trut rode trains through Siberia to visit fox farms. She wasn’t looking for furs. She needed a farm to host an audacious experiment dreamed up by geneticist Dmitry Belyaev: to create a domestic animal as docile as a dog from aggressive, wily silver foxes.

    Evolutionary...

    04/29/2017 - 08:00 History of Science, Genetics, Animals