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Your search has returned 1468 articles:
  • Film

    The Neil Armstrong biopic ‘First Man’ captures early spaceflight's terror

    First Man is not a movie about the moon landing.

    The Neil Armstrong biopic, opening October 12, follows about eight years of the life of the first man on the moon, and spends about eight minutes depicting the lunar surface. Instead of the triumphant ticker tape parades that characterize many movies about the space race, First Man focuses on the terror, grief and heartache that led to...

    10/12/2018 - 15:45 Astronomy, History of Science, Science & Society
  • News

    The first observed wimpy supernova may have birthed a neutron star duo

    A faint, fleeting supernova may be the key to understanding how neutron star duos are born.

    Astronomers have spotted what seems to be an ultrastripped supernova: a massive star in its death throes after its outer layers of gas have been siphoned off slowly by a compact companion such as a neutron star or black hole.

    “This is the first of its kind: the first ultrastripped supernova...

    10/11/2018 - 14:00 Astronomy
  • News

    If the past is a guide, Hubble’s new trouble won’t doom the space telescope

    Hubble’s in trouble again.

    The 28-year-old space telescope, in orbit around the Earth, put itself to sleep on October 5 because of an undiagnosed problem with one of its steering wheels. But once more, astronomers are optimistic about Hubble’s chances of recovery. After all, it’s just the latest nail-biting moment in the history of a telescope that has defied all life-expectancy...

    10/10/2018 - 15:03 Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    What bees did during the Great American Eclipse

    When the 2017 Great American Eclipse hit totality and the sky went dark, bees noticed.

    Microphones in flower patches at 11 sites in the path of the eclipse picked up the buzzing sounds of bees flying among blooms before and after totality. But those sounds were noticeably absent during the full solar blackout, a new study finds.

    Dimming light and some summer cooling during the...

    10/10/2018 - 10:00 Animals, Astronomy
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Einstein’s Shadow’ explores what it takes to snap a black hole’s picture

    Einstein’s ShadowSeth FletcherEcco, $26.99

    Right now, a ragtag team of astronomers, assembled from institutes across the globe, may be peering in wonder at the first picture of a black hole’s shadow. The quest to create such an image has involved a massive level of scientific coordination, combining data from telescopes at eight observatories scattered from the South Pole to Hawaii...

    10/05/2018 - 13:07 Astronomy, Physics
  • News

    Saturn’s ‘ring rain’ is a surprising cocktail of chemicals

    The “ring rain” of material falling from Saturn’s rings into the planet’s atmosphere is a much more intense, contaminated downpour than scientists thought.

    For decades, astronomers have suspected that Saturn’s rings pelt the planet with grains of water ice, but some of the final observations from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft provide the first detailed views of these celestial showers (SN: 4...

    10/04/2018 - 14:00 Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • News

    Hubble may have spotted the first known exomoon

    The first suspected exomoon is coming into focus. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope bolster the case for a Neptune-sized moon orbiting a gas exoplanet 8,000 light-years away, astronomers report October 3 in Science Advances. The moon’s existence, if confirmed, would challenge theories of how satellites are born.

    Astronomers David Kipping and Alex Teachey of Columbia University...

    10/03/2018 - 14:00 Astronomy, Exoplanets
  • Rethink

    We may not have found aliens yet because we’ve barely begun looking

    With no luck so far in a six-decade search for signals from aliens, you’d be forgiven for thinking, “Where is everyone?”

    A new calculation shows that if space is an ocean, we’ve barely dipped in a toe. The volume of observable space combed so far for E.T. is comparable to searching the volume of a large hot tub for evidence of fish in Earth’s oceans, astronomer Jason Wright at Penn State...

    09/30/2018 - 08:00 Astronomy, Astrobiology
  • Feature

    Paula Jofré makes stellar connections

    Paula Jofré, 36Galactic and stellar astrophysicsUniversidad Diego Portales, Santiago, Chile

    Paula Jofré wants to map the galactic lineage of every star in the Milky Way. It’s like tracing your family tree, if your grandparents were supernovas.

    Jofré, 36, is an astrophysicist at Universidad Diego Portales in Santiago, Chile, where she studies the inner lives and histories of stars....

    09/26/2018 - 08:31 Astronomy
  • News

    Astronomers may have spotted the birth of a neutron star

    For the first time, astronomers may have watched a massive stellar explosion give rise in real time to a superdense dead star called a neutron star.

    New observations of supernova 2012au show charged oxygen and sulfur atoms fleeing the scene of the explosion at 2,300 kilometers per second. That suggests the shells of gas surrounding the dense remains of the original star are being lit up...

    09/25/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy