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E.g., 03/22/2019
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Your search has returned 769 articles:
  • News

    The learning gap between rich and poor students hasn’t changed in decades

    The average performance of the lowest income students in the United States lags about three to four years behind that of the highest income students — an achievement gap that has remained constant for more than four decades, a new study finds.

    An analysis of standardized tests given to more than 2.7 million middle and high school students over almost 50 years suggests that federal...

    03/19/2019 - 10:11 Science & Society, Human Development
  • Exhibit

    A new T. rex exhibit takes a deep dive into the iconic dinosaur

    Ultrafierce Tyrannosaurus rex is an icon. But the “tyrant lizard king,” which lived between 68 million and 66 million years ago, is just the youngest member of a family of dinosaurs that went back to about 167 million years ago. The earliest tyrannosaurs were quick and small. So how did T. rex become so big and bad?

    That’s one of the questions at the heart of “T. rex: The Ultimate...

    03/15/2019 - 07:00 Paleontology, Animals, Science & Society
  • News

    Students worldwide are striking to demand action on climate change

    For the past several months, growing numbers of students around the world have been cutting class — not to play but to protest.

    The topic driving them is the same: Earth’s changing climate, as evidenced by increasing wildfires and droughts, rising seas and more extreme weather. As the students see it, governments have not done enough to cut the emissions of greenhouse gases, such as...

    03/14/2019 - 08:00 Climate, Science & Society
  • News

    Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies

    Eighteen researchers, including two CRISPR pioneers, are calling for a temporary ban on creating gene-edited babies.

    “We call for a global moratorium on all clinical uses of human germline editing — that is, changing heritable DNA (in sperm, eggs or embryos) to make genetically modified children,” the statement’s cosigners, who come from seven countries, wrote in the March 14 Nature....

    03/13/2019 - 14:00 Genetics, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    Nine companies are steering the future of artificial intelligence

    The Big NineAmy WebbPublicAffairs, $27

    Whether artificial intelligence is humankind’s best friend or greatest threat has been widely debated. We’ve all heard promises of device-studded smart homes conferring unprecedented convenience, as well as warnings of killer robots. The Big Nine is a different kind of story about the potential risks and rewards of AI.

    Rather than...

    03/12/2019 - 14:38 Science & Society, Technology, Artificial Intelligence
  • Editor's Note

    How newsy science becomes Science News

    Helping people stay up to speed on the latest advances in science is a big part of our mission at Science News. We’re aiming for sophisticated and succinct, in a way that works for readers’ busy lives. That means making tough decisions on which of the countless scientific papers being published are worthy of coverage and what breaking news has science that needs explanation and...
    03/07/2019 - 06:15 Science & Society, Health, Earth
  • News

    Welfare reforms may have hurt some single moms’ teenage kids

    Welfare reforms in the 1990s were meant to break the intergenerational cycle of poverty. But they may have had an unanticipated side effect.

    A new study suggests the reforms contributed to a rise in problematic teen behaviors, such as skipping school, getting in fights and using drugs. These problems were especially pronounced in boys, researchers report in a paper posted online February...

    03/04/2019 - 09:00 Science & Society
  • News

    Genes might explain why dogs can’t sniff out some people under stress

    BALTIMORE — Some police dogs may smell fear, and that could be bad news for finding missing people whose genetic makeup leaves them more prone to stress.

    Trained police dogs couldn’t recognize stressed-out people with a particular version of a gene that’s involved in stress management, geneticist Francesco Sessa reported February 22 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of...

    02/27/2019 - 14:45 Genetics, Physiology, Science & Society
  • News

    A long handshake can spread your DNA to objects you didn’t touch

    BALTIMORE — A 10-second handshake could transfer a person’s DNA to an object that the person never touched.

    In handshaking experiments, people who never picked up a knife became the major source of DNA on the handle about 7 percent of the time, forensic scientist Cynthia Cale reported February 21 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. That DNA was transferred...

    02/26/2019 - 14:53 Genetics, Science & Society
  • Editor's Note

    Scientists set sail for the elusive island of stability

    On March 6, 1869, Dmitrii Mendeleev’s periodic table was unveiled, and we’ve launched a yearlong celebration of the 150th anniversary of his iconic work. In this issue, we’re looking ahead to imagine the periodic table of the future, as scientists strive to create bizarre new elements. And we also set ourselves a science visualization challenge: charting the half-lives of all the...
    02/26/2019 - 06:15 Science & Society, Chemistry, Physics