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E.g., 08/17/2019
E.g., 08/17/2019
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  • Asian carp
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Your search has returned 4421 articles:
  • News

    A mussel poop diet could fuel invasive carp’s spread across Lake Michigan

    If invasive carp reach Lake Michigan, a buffet of mussel poop and other junk food could help the fish survive and spread.

    Once thought to be a food desert for these fish, the lake may provide enough nutrition for two Asian carp species, bighead (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp  (H. molitrix), thanks to their not-so-picky eating habits, researchers report August 12 in...

    08/13/2019 - 10:50 Ecosystems, Animals, Ecology
  • News

    How these tiny insect larvae leap without legs

    No legs? Not a problem. Some pudgy insect larvae can still jump up to 36 times their body length. Now high-speed video reveals how.

    First, a legless, bright orange Asphondylia gall midge larva fastens its body into a fat, lopsided O by meshing together front and rear patches of microscopic fuzz. The rear part of the larva swells, and starts to straighten like a long, overinflating...

    08/08/2019 - 18:20 Biophysics, Animals, Evolution
  • Teaser

    A fungus makes a chemical that neutralizes the stench of skunk spray

    A puppy pal that gets sprayed by a skunk is no friend to human noses. The nasty odor can linger for weeks or more.

    But at least one kind of Tolypocladium fungi makes a chemical that can snuff out the stink. Called pericosine, it reacts with skunk spray’s sulfur-containing compounds, forming residues that aren’t offensive to the nose and can be more easily washed away, researchers report...

    08/06/2019 - 10:00 Chemistry, Animals, Fungi
  • It's Alive

    There’s more to pufferfish than that goofy spiked balloon

    So what if fish need water to live. For certain pufferfish, flirting on the sand of a moonlit beach is irresistible (in bursts). And that’s not the only odd thing the ocean’s famous self-inflators do.    

    Some of the 200 or so species in the puffer family take courtship to extremes. On a few moonlit nights a year at some Asian shores, Japanese grass pufferfish (Takifugu niphobles) flock...

    08/01/2019 - 12:07 Animals, Genetics, Evolution
  • News

    Monkeys can use basic logic to decipher the order of items in a list

    Monkeys can keep strings of information in order by using a simple kind of logical thought.

    Rhesus macaque monkeys learned the order of items in a list with repeated exposure to pairs of items plucked from the list, say psychologist Greg Jensen of Columbia University and colleagues. The animals drew basic logical conclusions about pairs of listed items, akin to assuming that if A comes...

    07/31/2019 - 14:03 Psychology, Animals
  • Science Visualized

    Mapping how the ‘immortal’ hydra regrows cells may demystify regeneration

    Hydras seem to have found the fountain of youth, perpetually renewing their cells and regrowing damaged body parts. The tiny tubelike creatures, with a tentacle-ringed mouth and a sticky foot, can regrow their entire bodies from just a scrap of tissue.

    These freshwater invertebrates’ regenerative superpowers hinge on three groups of stem cells that develop into specific cells of the...

    07/26/2019 - 12:14 Cells, Development, Animals
  • News

    A frog study may point to where parenting begins in the brain

    Most frogs lay oodles of eggs and quickly hop away. But some poison dart frogs baby their offspring, cleaning and hydrating eggs laid on land and piggybacking hatched tadpoles to water.

    A peek inside the brains of these nurturing amphibians reveals that in males and females, two regions linked with caring for young are the same — a finding that may provide clues to the neural...

    07/24/2019 - 07:03 Neuroscience, Animals
  • News in Brief

    A deadly fungus gives ‘zombie’ ants a case of lockjaw

    Fungus-infected “zombie” ants are known to scale a plant, sink their jaws into a leaf or twig and wait to die while the Ophiocordyceps unilateralis fungi feast on the insects’ bodies. Eventually, a fungal stalk shoots out of the ant’s head and releases spores that rain down and infect more ants below.

    The carpenter ants’ part in this nightmare may seem dictated by mind control, but the...

    07/17/2019 - 18:00 Animals, Fungi, Ecology
  • News

    This gene may help worms live longer, but not healthier

    Long life and good health don’t always go hand in hand. 

    A gene that lengthens nematode worms’ lives and is necessary for reproduction also makes the worms more susceptible to infection and stress, researchers report July 17 in Nature Communications. That’s unusual; longevity-promoting genes generally help organisms deal with stress, says Arjumand Ghazi, a geneticist who studies aging at...

    07/17/2019 - 05:00 Genetics, Animals
  • News

    Spraying bats with ‘good’ bacteria may combat deadly white nose syndrome

    A one-time spritz with a solution of beneficial bacteria may help bats infected with white nose syndrome survive the deadly disease.

    Boosting the amount of naturally antifungal Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria that are already present on many bats’ skin allowed nearly half of the animals to live through winter, compared with only 8 percent surviving in an untreated group, a small study...

    07/15/2019 - 09:00 Conservation, Animals, Fungi