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E.g., 06/22/2018
E.g., 06/22/2018
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Your search has returned 110311 articles:
  • Scicurious

    Fighting sexual harassment in science may mean changing science itself

    The #MeToo movement has revealed sexual and gender harassment in every corner of American life. Science hasn’t been immune. High profile cases — such as decades’ worth of complaints against astronomer Geoff Marcy, and allegations that geologist David Marchant verbally and physically abused women scientists in Antarctica — make headlines. But it is the often underreported gender harassment,...

    06/22/2018 - 15:45 Science & Society
  • For Daily Use

    What is it about hogweed — and lemons and limes — that can cause burns?

    Another warning to add to the summertime list: check for ticks, go inside during lightning … and hands off the giant hogweed. Getting the plant’s sap on the skin, along with exposure to sun, can lead to severe burns.

    All good advice, but the invasive plant, which looks like Queen Anne’s lace on steroids, and was recently spotted in Virginia, isn’t the only vegetation that contains the...

    06/22/2018 - 10:00 Health
  • It's Alive

    How a squishy clam conquers a rock

    Burrowing giant clams have perfected the ship-in-a-bottle trick, and the one big thing that scientists convinced themselves couldn’t explain it, actually can.

    Tridacna crocea, the smallest of the 10 or so giant clam species, grows a shell that eventually reaches the size of a large fist. Starting as youngsters, the burrowers bore into the stony mass of an Indo-Pacific coral reef,...

    06/22/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Physiology, Microbes
  • News

    New studies add evidence to a possible link between Alzheimer’s and herpesvirus

    Joel Dudley and his colleagues were searching through datasets for Alzheimer’s disease vulnerabilities to exploit in creating a treatment when they stumbled across a surprising correlation: Many of the brains they looked at had signs of herpesvirus infection. But those from people with Alzheimer’s disease had much higher levels of viral DNA than those from healthy people.

    In particular,...

    06/22/2018 - 06:00 Health, Neuroscience, Genetics
  • News

    Koko the gorilla is gone, but she left a legacy

    When Koko died in her sleep in California on June 19, people throughout the world immediately began mourning the gorilla.

    Koko was a charmer and undeniably smart. She took an unusual route to fame. Stanford University graduate student Francine Patterson started teaching Koko a version of sign language in 1972, the year after the infant ape was born. Patterson rapidly developed a deep...

    06/21/2018 - 17:35 Anthropology, Animals
  • News in Brief

    Here’s how drinking coffee could protect your heart

    Coffee revs up cell’s energy factories and helps hearts recover from heart attacks, a study of mice suggests.

    In the study, researchers gave mice the equivalent of four cups of coffee a day for 10 days before inducing heart attacks in the rodents. Cells in mice that got caffeine repaired the heart attack damage better than cells in mice that didn’t get caffeine, researchers report June...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells, Physiology
  • News in Brief

    Einstein’s general relativity reigns supreme, even on a galactic scale

    Chalk up another win for Einstein’s seemingly invincible theory of gravity. A new study shows that the theory of general relativity holds true even over vast distances.

    General relativity prevailed within a region spanning a galactic distance of about 6,500 light-years, scientists report in the June 22 Science. Previously, researchers have precisely tested the theory by studying its...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    It may take a village (of proteins) to turn on genes

    Turning on genes may work like forming a flash mob.

    Inside a cell’s nucleus, fast-moving groups of floppy proteins crowd together around gene control switches and coalesce into droplets to turn on genes, Ibrahim Cissé of MIT and colleagues report June 21 in two papers in Science.

    Researchers have previously demonstrated that proteins form such droplets in the cytoplasm, the cell’s...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Cells
  • News

    A 2,200-year-old Chinese tomb held a new gibbon species, now extinct

    A royal crypt from China’s past has issued a conservation alert for apes currently eking out an existence in East Asia.

    The partial remains of a gibbon were discovered in 2004 in an excavation of a 2,200- to 2,300-year-old tomb in central China’s Shaanxi Province. Now, detailed comparisons of the animal’s face and teeth with those of living gibbons show that the buried ape is from a...

    06/21/2018 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • Science Ticker

    Splitting families may end, but migrant kids’ trauma needs to be studied

    Faced with a growing outcry against separating migrant children from their families at the U.S. border — including this statement from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine — President Trump reversed course June 20 and issued an executive order aimed at keeping detained families together.

    Scientists, armed with evidence that traumatic events early in life can have...

    06/20/2018 - 17:39 Neuroscience, Psychology, Science & Society