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  • News in Brief

    Black kids commit suicide at twice the rate of white children

    Suicide rates for children ages 5 to 12 are roughly twice as high for black children as for white children, according to new data. But for adolescents ages 13 to 17, the pattern flips, with white kids having higher suicide rates, researchers report online May 21 in JAMA Pediatrics.

    The new study is based on an analysis of suicide rates among children ages 5 to 17 from 2001 to 2015....

    05/22/2018 - 09:00 Health, Mental Health
  • News

    A caterpillar outwits corn defenses by gorging on fattening ‘junk’ food

    Here’s the story of a caterpillar that foils gruesome violence orchestrated by corn.

    No, that’s not backward. Plants often look helpless to a human, but they fight with smells and other invisible chemistry. A growing body of evidence, for example, shows that plants under attack can waft out scents that attract help, such as tiny wasps that deal a lingering death to leaf-chewing...

    05/22/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Plants, Ecology
  • Science Ticker

    Ebola vaccinations begin in Congo

    Emergency teams responding to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in Congo began on May 21 inoculating those most at risk of contracting the virus: health workers and people who have come into contact with Ebola victims. It’s the first real-world test for an experimental vaccine, rVSV-ZEBOV. In field trials in Guinea and Sierra Leone in 2015, this vaccine effectively protected people from Zaire...

    05/21/2018 - 17:58 Health
  • News

    Gun owner or not, Americans agree on many ways to limit gun violence

    Despite a public debate that grows more fractious with every school shooting — from Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., to Parkland, Fla., and the latest deadly attack May 18 in Santa Fe, Texas — Americans actually agree on gun policy to a surprising extent.  

    According to a new survey of more than 2,100 people, majorities of both gun owners and nonowners support 15 potential gun...

    05/21/2018 - 13:23 Psychology, Science & Society
  • Science Visualized

    Satellite smashups could have given birth to Saturn’s odd moons

    A space ravioli. A planetary baguette. A cosmic Kaiser roll. Some of Saturn’s moons have shapes that are strangely reminiscent of culinary concoctions.

    Images of the oddball moons, mostly from the now-defunct Cassini spacecraft (SN Online: 9/15/17), got planetary scientists wondering how these satellites ended up with such strange shapes. Now, researchers suggest that collisions between...

    05/21/2018 - 11:00 Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Maverick asteroid might be an immigrant from outside the solar system

    An asteroid that flouts the norms of the solar system might not be from around here.

    The renegade asteroid travels around the sun in reverse — in the opposite direction of the planets and most other asteroids (SN: 5/13/17, p. 5). Now two scientists suggest that’s because the space rock originated from outside the solar system, according to a paper published May 21 in Monthly Notices of...

    05/21/2018 - 08:00 Astronomy
  • Science Ticker

    China is set to launch a satellite to support a future lunar rover

    Editor's note: The Chang’e-4 relay satellite successfully lifted off from the Xichang Satellite Launch center at 5:28 a.m. Beijing time on May 21 (5:28 p.m. EDT on May 20).

    The Chinese space program is set to launch a satellite aimed at supporting future communications from a planned mission to the farside of the moon.

    The Chang’e-4 mission, which will include a rover and a lander...

    05/20/2018 - 10:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    What we know about the Ebola outbreak, and the vaccine that might help

    Ebola has reemerged. The virus has killed at least 25 people since early April in an ongoing outbreak in Congo.  And on May 18, the World Health Organization declared a “high” public health risk in Congo, as well as a “high risk” of the disease spreading to neighboring countries, but stopped short of declaring a global public health emergency.

    Most of the 43 confirmed and suspected cases...

    05/18/2018 - 19:19 Health
  • Scicurious

    To regulate fecal transplants, FDA has to first answer a serious question: What is poop?

    When severe, chronic diarrhea strikes, sometimes the only cure is … more feces. It might seem bizarre, but a transplant of healthy human stool and its bacterial ecosystem can mean freedom from a painful, life-threatening illness.  

    The transplants — called fecal microbiota transplants, or FMTs — are becoming more and more popular. So popular that the stool bank OpenBiome has supplied...

    05/18/2018 - 10:00 Health
  • For Daily Use

    The CDC advises: Don’t swallow the water in a hotel swimming pool

    It’s vacation season — time for swimming pools, hot tubs and waterparks. But you might want to think twice before getting wet, says a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    From 2000 to 2014, public health officials from 46 states and Puerto Rico reported 493 outbreaks associated with treated recreational water, resulting in more than 27,000 illnesses and...

    05/18/2018 - 07:00 Health, Science & Society