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E.g., 12/15/2017
E.g., 12/15/2017
Your search has returned 50 images:
  • MRI images of brains
  • food
  • incubating chick
Your search has returned 65 articles:
  • Scicurious

    Even brain images can be biased

    An astonishing number of things that scientists know about brains and behavior are based on small groups of highly educated, mostly white people between the ages of 18 and 21. In other words, those conclusions are based on college students.

    College students make a convenient study population when you’re a researcher at a university. It makes for a biased sample, but one that’s still...

    12/15/2017 - 07:00 Neuroscience, Human Development
  • 50 years ago, folate deficiency was linked to birth defects

    Folic acid

    Pregnant women who do not have enough folic acid — a B vitamin — in their bodies can pass the deficiency on to their unborn children. It may lead to retarded growth and congenital malformation, according to Dr. A. Leonard Luhby…. “Folic acid deficiency in pregnant women could well constitute a public health problem of dimensions we have not originally recognized,” he says. — ...

    11/30/2017 - 07:00 Human Development, Health
  • News

    Animal study reveals how a fever early in pregnancy can cause birth defects

    Certain birth defects of the face and heart can occur when babies’ mothers have a fever during the first trimester of pregnancy, a crucial time in an embryo’s development. Now scientists have figured out the molecular players that make it so.  

    In an experiment with chicken embryos, a temporary rise in incubation temperature — meant to mimic feverlike conditions — was enough to produce...

    10/18/2017 - 14:00 Health, Human Development
  • Feature

    Birth control research is moving beyond the pill

    Mention “the pill,” and only one kind of drug comes to mind. The claim that oral contraceptives have on that simple noun testifies to the pill’s singular effect in the United States. Introduced in 1960, the pill gave women reliable access to birth control for the first time. The opportunity to delay having children opened the door to higher education and professional careers for many women....

    08/22/2017 - 12:30 Health, Human Development
  • News

    Drinking sugary beverages in pregnancy linked to kids’ later weight gain

    An expectant mom might want to think twice about quenching her thirst with soda.

    The more sugary beverages a mom drank during mid-pregnancy, the heavier her kids were in elementary school compared with kids whose mothers consumed less of the drinks, a new study finds. At age 8, boys and girls weighed approximately 0.25 kilograms more — about half a pound — with each serving mom added per...

    07/10/2017 - 00:05 Health, Human Development
  • News

    African farmers’ kids conquer the marshmallow test

    Children of Nso farmers in Cameroon know how to master the marshmallow test, which has tempted away the self-control of Western kids for decades.

    In a direct comparison on this delayed gratification task, Cameroonian youngsters leave middle-class German children in the dust when challenged to resist a reachable treat while waiting for another goodie, a new study finds.

    Of 76 Nso 4-...

    06/19/2017 - 07:00 Psychology, Human Development
  • News

    For humans, the appeal of looking at faces starts before birth

    Fascination with faces is nature, not nurture, suggests a new study of third-trimester fetuses.

    Scientists have long known that babies like looking at faces more than other objects. But research published online June 8 in Current Biology offers evidence that this preference develops before birth. In the first-ever study of prenatal visual perception, fetuses were more likely to move...

    06/08/2017 - 12:00 Human Development
  • News

    Autism, ADHD risk not linked to prenatal exposure to antidepressants

    Taking antidepressants during pregnancy does not increase the risk of autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, two new large studies suggest. Genetic or environmental influences, rather than prenatal exposure to the drugs, may have a greater influence on whether a child will develop these disorders. The studies are published online April 18 in JAMA.

    Clinically, the message is...

    04/18/2017 - 14:56 Mental Health, Human Development
  • News

    Scientists seek early signs of autism

    Soon after systems biologist Juergen Hahn published a paper describing a way to predict whether a child has autism from a blood sample, the notes from parents began arriving. “I have a bunch of parents writing me now who want to test their kids,” says Hahn, of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y. “I can’t do that.”

    That’s because despite their promise, his group’s results,...

    04/10/2017 - 07:00 Human Development, Neuroscience
  • Science & the Public

    Transgender children are at greater risk of mental health problems

    Amid a flurry of cabinet appointments and immigration policies, the Trump administration has announced one thing it will not do: pursue policies that protect transgender children in public schools.The Feb. 22 announcement rescinds Obama administration guidelines that, among other protections, allow transgender kids to use bathrooms and participate in sports that correspond with their genders,...

    03/01/2017 - 07:00 Human Development, Science & Society, Health