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E.g., 11/24/2017
E.g., 11/24/2017
Your search has returned 222 images:
  • map of Yamnaya migrations
  • European skull
  • horse leg bone and croc tooth
Your search has returned 549 articles:
  • Feature

    How Asian nomadic herders built new Bronze Age cultures

    Nomadic herders living on western Asia’s hilly grasslands made a couple of big moves east and west around 5,000 years ago. These were not typical, back-and-forth treks from one seasonal grazing spot to another. These people blazed new trails.

    A technological revolution had transformed travel for ancient herders around that time. Of course they couldn’t make online hotel reservations....

    11/15/2017 - 12:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Genetics
  • News

    Ancient European farmers and foragers hooked up big time

    Thousands of years ago, hunter-gatherers native to Europe and incoming farmers from what’s now Turkey got up close and personal for a surprisingly long time, researchers say. This mixing reshaped the continent’s genetic profile differently from one region to another.

    Ancient DNA from foragers and farmers in eastern, central and western Europe indicates that they increasingly mated with...

    11/10/2017 - 07:00 Anthropology, Archaeology, Genetics
  • News

    Crocs take a bite out of claims of ancient stone-tool use

    Recent reports of African and North American animal fossils bearing stone-tool marks from being butchered a remarkably long time ago may be a crock. Make that a croc.

    Crocodile bites damage animal bones in virtually the same ways that stone tools do, say paleoanthropologist Yonatan Sahle of the University of Tübingen in Germany and his colleagues. Animal bones allegedly cut up for meat...

    11/06/2017 - 15:16 Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Scientists battle over whether violence has declined over time

    Contrary to a popular idea among researchers, modern states haven’t dulled people’s long-standing taste for killing each other in battle, a controversial new study concludes. But living in a heavily populated society may up one’s odds of surviving a war, two anthropologists propose.

    As a population grows, larger numbers of combatants die in wars, but those slain represent a smaller...

    10/20/2017 - 09:00 Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Ancient humans avoided inbreeding by networking

    DNA of people who lived around 34,000 years ago reveals an especially lively social scene that may have been a key to humans’ evolutionary success.

    Much like hunter-gatherers today, ancient Eurasians married outside their home groups and formed webs of friends and in-laws vital for eventually building cities and civilizations, a new study suggests.

    Long-gone hunter-gatherers lived...

    10/05/2017 - 14:00 Genetics, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • Feature

    Christina Warinner uncovers ancient tales in dental plaque

    Christina Warinner, 37Molecular anthropologistUniversity of OklahomaMax Planck Institute for theScience of Human History

    In a pitch-black rainforest with fluttering moths and crawling centipedes, Christina Warinner dug up her first skeleton. Well, technically it was a full skeleton plus two headless ones, all seated and draped in ornate jewelry. To deter looters, she excavated through the night...

    10/04/2017 - 13:45 Anthropology, Genetics, Archaeology
  • Reviews & Previews

    The rise of agricultural states came at a big cost, a new book argues

    Against the GrainJames C. ScottYale Univ., $26

    Contrary to popular opinion, humans didn’t shed a harsh existence as hunter-gatherers and herders for the good life of stay-in-place farming. Year-round farming villages and early agricultural states, such as those that cropped up in Mesopotamia, exchanged mobile groups’ healthy lifestyles for the back-breaking drudgery of cultivating crops...

    10/03/2017 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News

    Ancient boy’s DNA pushes back date of earliest humans

    A boy who lived in what’s now South Africa nearly 2,000 years ago has lent a helping genome to science. Using the long-gone youngster’s genetic instruction book, scientists have estimated that humans emerged as a distinct population earlier than typically thought, between 350,000 and 260,000 years ago.

    The trick was retrieving a complete version of the ancient boy’s DNA from his skeleton...

    09/28/2017 - 14:00 Genetics, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Neandertal kids were a lot like kids today — at least in how they grew

    A Neandertal child whose partial skeleton dates to around 49,000 years ago grew at the same pace as children do today, with a couple of exceptions. Growth of the child’s spine and brain lagged, a new study finds.

    It’s unclear, though, whether developmental slowing in those parts of the body applied only to Neandertals or to Stone Age Homo sapiens as well. If so, environmental conditions...

    09/25/2017 - 09:00 Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ponder mini-spacecraft and Canaanites’ genomes

    Spritely voyage

    Engineers recently launched prototypes of miniature spacecraft. The prototypes, each a single circuit board, include solar panels, radios, thermometers and gyroscopes, Maria Temming reported in “These chip-sized spacecraft are the smallest space probes yet” (SN: 9/2/17, p. 5).

    “Does the gyroscope actually stabilize the chip, or just provide information that can be signaled...

    09/20/2017 - 13:00 Astronomy, Anthropology