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E.g., 09/24/2017
E.g., 09/24/2017
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  • Viking raid illustrated
  • pictures from Santa Elina rock shelter
Your search has returned 540 articles:
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ponder mini-spacecraft and Canaanites’ genomes

    Spritely voyage

    Engineers recently launched prototypes of miniature spacecraft. The prototypes, each a single circuit board, include solar panels, radios, thermometers and gyroscopes, Maria Temming reported in “These chip-sized spacecraft are the smallest space probes yet” (SN: 9/2/17, p. 5).

    “Does the gyroscope actually stabilize the chip, or just provide information that can be signaled...

    09/20/2017 - 13:00 Astronomy, Anthropology
  • News

    Skeleton ignites debate over whether women were Viking warriors

    Viking warriors have a historical reputation as tough guys, with an emphasis on testosterone. But scientists now say that DNA has unveiled a Viking warrior woman who was previously found in a roughly 1,000-year-old grave in Sweden. Until now, many researchers assumed that “she” was a “he” buried with a set of weapons and related paraphernalia worthy of a high-ranking military officer.

    If...

    09/13/2017 - 15:49 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News

    Science can’t forecast love

    Here’s some heartbreaking news for people pinning their hopes on online matchmaking sites: It’s virtually impossible to forecast a love connection.

    Maybe that’s not so shocking to survivors of the dating wars. But now science is weighing in. Extensive background data on two individuals — comparable to that collected by digital dating services — can’t predict whether that pair will...

    09/11/2017 - 07:00 Psychology, Anthropology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers were curious about rogue planets, exomoons and more

    Going rogue

    Astronomers estimate that wandering Jupiter-mass planets without a parent star are about a tenth as common as once believed, Ashley Yeager reported in “Giant solo planets are in limited supply” (SN: 8/19/17, p. 10).

    Online reader Brian Bixby wondered how often such a rogue planet would come close to our solar system and proposed that one near the Kuiper Belt or Oort cloud...

    09/06/2017 - 13:30 Planetary Science, Exoplanets, Anthropology
  • Science Ticker

    People may have lived in Brazil more than 20,000 years ago

    People hunted giant sloths in the center of South America around 23,120 years ago, researchers say — a find that adds to evidence that humans reached South America well before Clovis hunters roamed North America roughly 13,000 years ago.

    Evidence of people’s presence at Santa Elina rock shelter, located in a forested part of central-west Brazil, so long ago raises questions about how...

    09/05/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News in Brief

    People may have lived in Brazil more than 20,000 years ago

    People hunted giant sloths in the center of South America around 23,120 years ago, researchers say — a find that adds to evidence that humans reached South America well before Clovis hunters roamed North America 13,000 years ago.

    Evidence of people’s presence at Santa Elina rock-shelter, in central-west Brazil, so long ago raises questions about how people first entered South America....

    09/05/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • Science Ticker

    Spiritual convictions and group identities inspire terrorist acts, study finds

    Islamic militants and their fiercest opponents fight and die for intensely spiritual reasons, a new report finds.

    Islamic State (also known as ISIS) soldiers and Kurds who have fiercely battled them sacrifice themselves for sacred, nonnegotiable values, says a team led by anthropologist Scott Atran of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. These soldiers’ will to fight also depends on...

    09/04/2017 - 11:00 Anthropology, Psychology
  • News

    Fiery re-creations show how Neandertals could have easily made tar

    Neandertals took stick-to-itiveness to a new level. Using just scraps of wood and hot embers, our evolutionary cousins figured out how to make tar, a revolutionary adhesive that they used to make formidable spears, chopping tools and other implements by attaching sharp-edged stones to handles, a new study suggests.

    Researchers already knew that tar-coated stones date to at least 200,000...

    08/31/2017 - 09:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News

    Nitty-gritty of Homo naledi’s diet revealed in its teeth

    Give Homo naledi credit for originality. The fossils of this humanlike species previously revealed an unexpectedly peculiar body plan. Now its pockmarked teeth speak to an unusually hard-edged diet.

    H. naledi displays a much higher rate of chipped teeth than other members of the human evolutionary family that once occupied the same region of South Africa, say biological anthropologist...

    08/24/2017 - 14:00 Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Some secrets of China’s terra-cotta army are baked in the clay

    China’s first emperor broke the mold when he had himself buried with a terra-cotta army. Now insight into the careful crafting of those soldiers is coming from the clays used to build them. Custom clay pastes were mixed at a clay-making center and then distributed to specialized workshops that cranked out thousands of the life-size figures, new research suggests.

    Roughly 700,000...

    08/22/2017 - 09:30 Anthropology, Archaeology