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E.g., 01/19/2018
E.g., 01/19/2018
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  • worker honeybee
  • pelican spider
Your search has returned 1981 articles:
  • News

    The mystery of vanishing honeybees is still not definitively solved

    It was one of the flashiest mysteries in the news about a decade ago — honeybee workers were vanishing fast for no clear reason. To this day, that puzzle has never been entirely solved, researchers acknowledge.

    And maybe it never will be. Colony collapse disorder, or CCD, as the sudden mass honeybee losses were called, has faded in recent years as mysteriously as it began. It’s possible...

    01/17/2018 - 13:42 Animals, Agriculture, Science & Society
  • News

    Tiny scales in ancient lagoon may be the first fossil evidence of the moth-butterfly line

    Newly described little scaly bits could push back the fossil record of the moth-and-butterfly branch on the tree of life by some 70 million years. That raises the question of whether the drinking-straw mouthparts evolved long before the flower nectar many drink today.

    The microscopic ridged scales date from roughly 200 million years ago, around the time of one of Earth’s less famous mass...

    01/15/2018 - 07:00 Paleontology, Evolution, Animals
  • Introducing

    18 new species of pelican spiders discovered

    Despite their name, pelican spiders aren’t massive, fish-eating monstrosities. In fact, the shy spiders in the family Archaeidae are as long as a grain of rice and are a threat only to other spiders.

    Discovering a new species of these tiny Madagascar spiders is tough, but Hannah Wood has done just that — 18 times over.

    Wood, an arachnologist at the Smithsonian National Museum of...

    01/11/2018 - 18:15 Animals, Ecology
  • Science Visualized

    Why some birds of paradise have ultrablack feathers

    Some birds of paradise really know how to work their angles. Tilted, microscopic filaments in some of the showy birds’ black feathers make that plumage look much darker than traditional black feathers, researchers report online January 9 in Nature Communications.

    Dakota McCoy, an evolutionary biologist at Harvard University, and colleagues measured how much light each type of black...

    01/09/2018 - 11:44 Animals, Biophysics
  • News in Brief

    Warming ocean water is turning 99 percent of these sea turtles female

    Warming waters are turning some sea turtle populations female — to the extreme. More than 99 percent of young green turtles born on beaches along the northern Great Barrier Reef are female, researchers report January 8 in Current Biology. If that imbalance in sex continues, the overall population could shrink.

    Green sea turtle embryos develop as male or female depending on the...

    01/08/2018 - 19:30 Climate, Animals, Oceans
  • News

    Blowflies use drool to keep their cool

    SAN FRANCISCO — Blowflies don’t sweat, but they have raised cooling by drooling to a high art.

    In hot times, sturdy, big-eyed Chrysomya megacephala flies repeatedly release — and then retract — a droplet of saliva, Denis Andrade reported January 4 at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. This process isn’t sweating. Blowfly droplets put the cooling...

    01/05/2018 - 18:04 Animals, Physiology
  • News

    ‘Laid-back’ bonobos take a shine to belligerents

    Despite a reputation as mellow apes, bonobos have a thing for bad guys.

    Rather than latching on to individuals with a track record of helpfulness, adult bonobos favor obstructionists who keep others from getting what they want. The result may help explain what differentiates humans’ cooperative skills from those of other apes, biological anthropologists Christopher Krupenye of the...

    01/05/2018 - 15:18 Anthropology, Animals, Evolution
  • News in Brief

    Corals are severely bleaching five times as often as in 1980

    Corals are in hot water.

    Severe bleaching events are hitting coral reefs five times as often as in 1980, researchers report in the Jan. 5 Science.

    Scientists surveyed 100 coral reef locations in tropical zones around the world, tracking each spot’s fate from 1980 to 2016. At first, only a few of the locations had experienced bleaching. But by 2016, all had been hit by at least one...

    01/04/2018 - 14:00 Oceans, Climate, Animals
  • It's Alive

    Robot fish shows how the deepest vertebrate in the sea takes the pressure

    It’s like having “an elephant stand on your thumb.”

    That’s how deep-sea physiologist and ecologist Mackenzie Gerringer describes the pressure squeezing down on the deepest known living fish, some 8 kilometers down. What may help these small, pale Mariana snailfish survive elephantine squashing, says Gerringer of the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Labs, is a body bulked up,...

    01/03/2018 - 07:00 Animals, Biophysics, Physiology
  • Year in Review

    Watch our most-viewed videos of 2017

    No story on the Science News website is complete without visuals. And when it comes to videos, those visuals have lives of their own on other platforms. In addition to incorporating videos into some of our articles, we also post videos to the Science News YouTube channel and the Science News magazine Facebook page, where thousands of people watch them each year.

    We tackled all manner of...

    12/29/2017 - 07:00 Science & Society, Physics, Animals, Astronomy