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E.g., 06/19/2018
E.g., 06/19/2018
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  • world map of submarine fiber-optic cables
  • Antarctic iceberg
  • Fuego volcano
Your search has returned 1022 articles:
  • News

    Underwater fiber-optic cables could moonlight as earthquake sensors

    The global network of seafloor cables may be good for more than ferrying digital communication between continents. These fiber-optic cables could also serve as underwater earthquake detectors, researchers report online June 14 in Science.

    “It’s a very exciting proposition,” says Barbara Romanowicz, a seismologist at the University of California, Berkeley and the Collège de France in...

    06/14/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Oceans, Technology
  • News

    Antarctica has lost about 3 trillion metric tons of ice since 1992

    Antarctica is losing ice at an increasingly rapid pace. In just the last five years, the frozen continent has shed ice nearly three times faster on average than it did over the previous 20 years.

    An international team of scientists has combined data from two dozen satellite surveys in the most comprehensive assessment of Antarctica’s ice sheet mass yet. The conclusion: The frozen...

    06/13/2018 - 13:23 Climate, Earth, Oceans
  • Science Visualized

    Here’s a look at the world’s deadliest volcanoes — and the ways they kill

    Guatemala’s Fuego volcano erupted explosively on June 3, sending hot gas and rock racing downhill in what’s known as a pyroclastic flow. At least 69 people were killed. Emergency officials are trying to reach buried villages to assess the scope of the disaster, but Fuego is already the world's deadliest eruption of 2018.

    The tragedy offers a grim reminder of the many dangers posed by...

    06/05/2018 - 13:09 Earth, Health
  • News

    Keeping global warming to 1.5 degrees C helps most species hold their ground

    Limiting global warming this century to just 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial temperatures would be a boon to the planet’s biodiversity. This lower warming threshold, compared with warming of 2 degrees C, will preserve much larger swaths of the geographic ranges of tens of thousands of land-based species of plants, vertebrates and insects living on the planet, a new study suggests.

    ...
    05/17/2018 - 14:21 Earth, Climate, Animals, Ecology
  • Science & the Public

    No, Kilauea won’t cause mass destruction

    Kilauea isn’t about to become another Krakatoa. So let’s just stop that rumor right there.

    Twitter was awash last weekend in indignant volcanologists responding to a now-corrected Associated Press story that appeared to link the Hawaii volcano to the so-called Ring of Fire, and suggest its eruption could spark others in the ring. That’s just wrong, for a number of reasons.

    The Ring...

    05/16/2018 - 17:02 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Satellite data backs theory of North Korean nuclear site collapse

    A new analysis of satellite images and seismic waves from North Korea’s nuclear test site support theories that the underground facility has at least partially collapsed.

    Seismologists across the world have been tracking the clandestine nuclear weapons program for years by analyzing vibrations that emanate from explosions at the test site under Mount Mantap (SN: 8/5/17, p. 18). Now,...

    05/10/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Science & Society
  • News

    How long will Kilauea’s eruption last?

    Cracks open in the ground. Lava creeps across roads, swallowing cars and homes. Fountains of molten rock shoot up to 70 meters high, catching treetops on fire.

    After a month of rumbling warning signs, Kilauea, Hawaii’s most active volcano, began a new phase of eruption last week. The volcano spewed clouds of steam and ash into the air on May 3, and lava gushed through several new rifts...

    05/08/2018 - 17:16 Earth
  • Science Stats

    Globetrotting tourists are leaving a giant carbon footprint on the Earth

    Going green may mean staying at home.

    Global tourism contributes about 8 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, researchers report May 7 in Nature Climate Change. That carbon footprint is about three times as large as tourism-related emissions estimated by previous studies.

    The jump is largely because the new study doesn’t just tally up emissions from the...

    05/07/2018 - 11:00 Climate, Earth
  • News in Brief

    Last year’s solar eclipse set off a wave in the upper atmosphere

    It was the eclipse felt ‘round the world. The August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse that crossed the United States launched a wave in the upper atmosphere that was detected nearly an hour later from Brazil (SN Online: 8/11/17).

    “The eclipse itself is a local phenomenon, but our study shows that it had effects around the world,” says space scientist Brian Harding of the University of...

    04/30/2018 - 14:43 Planetary Science, Earth
  • News

    Pumping water underground for power may have triggered South Korean quake

    Injecting fluid into the ground for geothermal power generation may have caused the magnitude 5.5 earthquake that shook part of South Korea on November 15, 2017. The liquid, pumped underground by the Pohang power plant, could have triggered a rupture along a nearby fault zone that was already stressed, two new studies suggest.

    If it’s confirmed that the plant is the culprit, the Pohang...

    04/27/2018 - 11:19 Earth