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E.g., 06/22/2018
E.g., 06/22/2018
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  • mind-control robot
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Your search has returned 921 articles:
  • News

    With this new system, robots can ‘read’ your mind

    Getting robots to do what we want would be a lot easier if they could read our minds.

    That sci-fi dream might not be so far off. With a new robot control system, a human can stop a bot from making a mistake and get the machine back on track using brain waves and simple hand gestures. People who oversee robots in factories, homes or hospitals could use this setup, to be presented at the...

    06/20/2018 - 00:00 Robotics, Technology
  • News

    Underwater fiber-optic cables could moonlight as earthquake sensors

    The global network of seafloor cables may be good for more than ferrying digital communication between continents. These fiber-optic cables could also serve as underwater earthquake detectors, researchers report online June 14 in Science.

    “It’s a very exciting proposition,” says Barbara Romanowicz, a seismologist at the University of California, Berkeley and the Collège de France in...

    06/14/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Oceans, Technology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers were curious about pendulum saws, laser tweezers and more

    Cutting remark

    Archaeologist Nicholas Blackwell built a version of a Bronze Age pendulum saw that may have been used to build Mycenaean palaces, Bruce Bower reported in “How a backyard pendulum saw sliced into a Bronze Age mystery” (SN: 4/28/18 & 5/12/18, p. 32).

    Reader Fredric Blum argued that a pendulum saw’s blade would have dulled too fast to completely cut through stone...

    06/12/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy, Archaeology, Technology
  • News in Brief

    A new AI can focus on one voice in a crowd

    Much like someone listening to a conversation at a crowded party, a new artificial intelligence can tune out background noise in videos to hear what a particular person on screen is saying.

    Humans are naturally good at focusing on specific voices amidst the din — a phenomenon known as the cocktail party effect (SN Online: 4/29/14). But until now, programs designed to listen for specific...

    06/11/2018 - 09:00 Artificial Intelligence, Technology
  • 50 years ago, NASA astronauts prepared to return to space

    Apollo milestone at last

    The spacecraft fire that killed three Apollo astronauts and rocked the space agency a year and a half ago is still being felt.… Last week, after a series of delays … a major milestone was finally reached: the first manned tests of an Apollo spacecraft to include all the new equipment and safeguards incorporated since the fire. — Science News, June 8, 1968....

    06/07/2018 - 07:00 Technology, History of Science
  • News in Brief

    A new 3-D printer builds temporary electronics on your skin

    A new 3-D printer draws precise patterns of electrically conductive material directly on a person’s skin, creating temporary, tattoolike electronic devices.

    Unlike other 3-D printers designed to layer material on stiff, motionless objects, the new system uses computer vision to compensate for a moving printing surface — say, the back of a fidgety hand, researchers report in the June 6...

    06/06/2018 - 14:30 Technology, Materials
  • Feature

    Future smart clothes could pack serious gadgetry

    In the future, leaving your phone charger at home will mean only one thing: You forgot to put on pants.

    Just as smartphones untethered users from their desktop computers, smart clothing is poised to bring personal electronics out of our pockets and onto our sleeves.

    The current generation of wearable technology that includes smart glasses and watches is still more marginal than...

    06/01/2018 - 10:57 Technology, Materials
  • For Daily Use

    Even in the shade, a car’s interior can get lethally hot

    Don’t count on a shady parking spot to save a child left in the back seat on a hot day.

    A new analysis of temperatures inside parked cars reveals that a toddler in a sunbathed vehicle would reach lethal body temperatures faster than one left in the shade. But even in a shaded car, a child could die from overheating within a few hours, researchers report online May 23 in Temperature.

    ...
    05/25/2018 - 09:00 Health, Technology
  • News in Brief

    Fleets of self-driving taxis could be choreographed to cut traffic

    Self-driving taxis that use an algorithm to work together like a well-oiled machine could someday cut down on city traffic.

    Researchers have created a computer program that can continually analyze incoming ride-hailing requests sent from a smartphone app and plot the most efficient course for each car in a self-driving fleet to take (SN Online: 11/21/17). Unlike standard taxis, which...

    05/23/2018 - 13:00 Technology, Science & Society
  • News

    Nanoparticles could help rescue malnourished crops

    Synthetic nanoparticles used to fight cancer could also heal sickly plants.

    The particles, called liposomes, are nanosized, spherical pouches that can deliver drugs to specific parts of the body (SN: 12/16/06, p. 398). Now, researchers have filled these tiny care packages with fertilizing nutrients. The new liposomes, described online May 17 in Scientific Reports, soak into plant leaves...

    05/17/2018 - 09:00 Agriculture, Technology