Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 01/16/2018
E.g., 01/16/2018
Your search has returned 590 images:
  • Streptococcus pyogenes
  • illustration of biofilm
  • illustration of a woman
Your search has returned 756 articles:
  • News

    Not all strep infections are alike and it may have nothing to do with you

    One person infected with strep bacteria might get a painful sore throat; another might face a life-threatening blood infection. Now, scientists are trying to pin down why.

    Variation between individuals’ immune systems may not be entirely to blame. Instead, extra genes picked up by some pathogens can cause different strains to have wildly different effects on the immune system, even in...

    01/11/2018 - 14:40 Health, Genetics, Immune Science
  • Teaser

    A new gel could help in the fight against deadly, drug-resistant superbugs

    A new antibacterial ointment could help take down drug-resistant bacteria.

    In human skin samples and mice, the medicine completely cleared wounds of MRSA, the strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is resistant to methicillin and other antibiotics, and antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Both microbes are known to cause serious infections in hospital patients. Researchers in the...

    01/10/2018 - 14:00 Microbes, Health, Technology
  • Feature

    Hormone replacement makes sense for some menopausal women

    Internist Gail Povar has many female patients making their way through menopause, some having a tougher time than others. Several women with similar stories stand out in her mind. Each came to Povar’s Silver Spring, Md., office within a year or two of stopping her period, complaining of frequent hot flashes and poor sleep at night. “They just felt exhausted all the time,” Povar says. “The joy...

    01/09/2018 - 14:00 Health
  • Soapbox

    The man flu struggle might be real, says one researcher

    Cold weather often brings with it hot takes on so-called man flu. That’s the phenomenon in which the flu hits men harder than women — or, depending on who you ask, when men exaggerate regular cold symptoms into flu symptoms. In time for the 2017–2018 flu season, one researcher has examined the scientific evidence for and against man flu.

    “The concept of man flu, as commonly defined, is...

    12/22/2017 - 12:00 Health, Immune Science
  • Science Ticker

    U.S. life expectancy drops for the second year in a row

    Life expectancy in the United States has decreased for the second year in a row, the first back-to-back drops in more than 50 years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

    In 2016, life expectancy at birth was 78.6 years for the U.S. population as a whole. That’s 0.1 year less than in 2015. For men, life expectancy decreased from 76.3 years in 2015 to 76.1 years in...

    12/21/2017 - 00:05 Health
  • News

    Specks in the brain attract Alzheimer’s plaque-forming protein

    Globs of an inflammation protein beckon an Alzheimer’s protein and cause it to accumulate in the brain, a study in mice finds. The results, described in the Dec. 21/28 Nature, add new details to the relationship between brain inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease.

    Researchers suspect that this inflammatory cycle is an early step in the disease, which raises the prospect of being able to...

    12/20/2017 - 13:30 Neuroscience, Health
  • News in Brief

    Gay, lesbian and bisexual high schoolers report ‘tragically high’ suicide risk

    High school students who identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual are more likely to report planning or attempting suicide compared with their heterosexual peers, a new study finds.

    In a nationwide survey in 2015, 40 percent of adolescents who identified as one of these sexual minorities or said they were unsure of their orientation reported seriously considering suicide. Thirty-five percent...

    12/19/2017 - 15:35 Health, Mental Health
  • News

    Fracking linked to low birth weight in Pennsylvania babies

    Living near a fracking site appears to be detrimental to infant health, a study eyeing the gas production practice in Pennsylvania suggests.

    Babies of moms living within one kilometer of a hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, site in the state had a 25 percent greater chance of being born underweight than did babies whose moms lived at least three kilometers away, researchers report online...

    12/13/2017 - 17:55 Health, Pollution
  • Year in Review

    Brains of former football players showed how common traumatic brain injuries might be

    There have been hints for years that playing football might come at a cost. But a study this year dealt one of the hardest hits yet to the sport, detailing the extensive damage in football players’ brains, and not just those who played professionally.       

    In a large collection of former NFL players’ postmortem brains, nearly every sample showed signs of chronic traumatic...

    12/13/2017 - 08:26 Neuroscience, Health, Science & Society
  • Year in Review

    Zika cases are down, but researchers prepare for the virus’s return

    One of the top stories of 2016 quietly exited much of the public’s consciousness in 2017. But it’s still a hot topic among scientists and for good reasons. After Zika emerged in the Western Hemisphere, it shook the Americas, as reports of infections and devastating birth defects swept through Brazil and Colombia, eventually reaching the United States. In a welcome turn, the number of Zika...

    12/13/2017 - 08:26 Health, Neuroscience