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E.g., 01/19/2018
E.g., 01/19/2018
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Your search has returned 564 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Protein helps old blood age the brains of young mice

    Old blood can prematurely age the brains of young mice, and scientists may now be closer to understanding how. A protein located in the cells that form a barrier between the brain and blood could be partly to blame, experiments on mice suggest.  

    If something similar happens in humans, scientists say, methods for countering the protein may hold promise for treating age-related brain...

    01/11/2018 - 07:00 Neuroscience
  • Screentime

    Website invites you to probe a 3-D human brain

    In movies, exploring the body up close often involves shrinking to microscopic sizes and taking harrowing rides through the blood. Thanks to a new virtual model, you can journey through a three-dimensional brain. No shrink ray required.

    The Society for Neuroscience and other organizations have long sponsored the website BrainFacts.org, which has basic information about how the human...

    01/09/2018 - 07:00 Neuroscience
  • Teaser

    Jazz improvisers score high on creativity

    Improvisation may give jazz artists a creative boost not seen among musicians more likely to stick to the score. Jazz musicians’ brains quickly embrace improvisational surprises, new research on the neural roots of creativity shows.

    Neuroscientist Emily Przysinda and colleagues at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn., measured the creative aptitudes of 12 jazz improvisers, 12...

    01/02/2018 - 12:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    Specks in the brain attract Alzheimer’s plaque-forming protein

    Globs of an inflammation protein beckon an Alzheimer’s protein and cause it to accumulate in the brain, a study in mice finds. The results, described in the Dec. 21/28 Nature, add new details to the relationship between brain inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease.

    Researchers suspect that this inflammatory cycle is an early step in the disease, which raises the prospect of being able to...

    12/20/2017 - 13:30 Neuroscience, Health
  • Scicurious

    Even brain images can be biased

    An astonishing number of things that scientists know about brains and behavior are based on small groups of highly educated, mostly white people between the ages of 18 and 21. In other words, those conclusions are based on college students.

    College students make a convenient study population when you’re a researcher at a university. It makes for a biased sample, but one that’s still...

    12/15/2017 - 07:00 Neuroscience, Human Development
  • News

    In a tally of nerve cells in the outer wrinkles of the brain, a dog wins

    If more nerve cells mean more smarts, then dogs beat cats, paws down, a new study on carnivores shows. That harsh reality may shock some friends of felines, but scientists say the real surprises are inside the brains of less popular carnivores. Raccoon brains are packed with nerve cells, for instance, while brown bear brains are sorely lacking.

    By comparing the numbers of nerve cells, or...

    12/14/2017 - 09:00 Neuroscience, Animals
  • Year in Review

    Brains of former football players showed how common traumatic brain injuries might be

    There have been hints for years that playing football might come at a cost. But a study this year dealt one of the hardest hits yet to the sport, detailing the extensive damage in football players’ brains, and not just those who played professionally.       

    In a large collection of former NFL players’ postmortem brains, nearly every sample showed signs of chronic traumatic...

    12/13/2017 - 08:26 Neuroscience, Health, Science & Society
  • Year in Review

    Zika cases are down, but researchers prepare for the virus’s return

    One of the top stories of 2016 quietly exited much of the public’s consciousness in 2017. But it’s still a hot topic among scientists and for good reasons. After Zika emerged in the Western Hemisphere, it shook the Americas, as reports of infections and devastating birth defects swept through Brazil and Colombia, eventually reaching the United States. In a welcome turn, the number of Zika...

    12/13/2017 - 08:26 Health, Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Mini brains may wrinkle and fold just like ours

    PHILADELPHIA — Flat brains growing on microscope slides may have revealed a new wrinkle in the story of how the brain folds.

    Cells inside the brains contract, while cells on the outside grow and push outward, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, discovered from working with the lab-grown brains, or organoids. This push and pull results in folds in the...

    12/12/2017 - 07:00 Cells, Neuroscience
  • Feature

    Scientists are seeking new strategies to fight multiple sclerosis

    James Davis used to be an avid outdoorsman. He surfed, hiked, skateboarded and rock climbed. Today, the 48-year-old from Albuquerque barely gets out of bed. He has the most severe form of multiple sclerosis, known as primary progressive MS, a worsening disease that destroys the central nervous system. Diagnosed in May 2011, Davis relied on a wheelchair within six months. He can no longer get...

    11/29/2017 - 15:30 Neuroscience, Immune Science, Health