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E.g., 09/24/2017
E.g., 09/24/2017
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Your search has returned 427 articles:
  • Science Visualized

    Tiny ‘supraballs’ put a new spin on creating long-lasting color

    Tiny balls of melanin could someday paint the rainbow. They’re one of the key ingredients in a new way to craft a spectrum of structural colors — hues created when light interacts with special nanostructures.

    Structural colors are a longer-lasting alternative to chemical pigments, which lose all pizazz when they break down. Examples of durable hues abound in nature. For instance, many...

    09/15/2017 - 14:08 Materials
  • News

    Animal goo inspires better glue

    Finding a great glue is a sticky task — especially if you want it to attach to something as slick as the inside of the human body. Even the strongest human-made adhesives don’t work well on wet surfaces like tissues and organs. For surgeons closing internal incisions, that’s more than an annoyance. The right glue could hold wounds together as effectively as stitches and staples with less...

    09/15/2017 - 12:00 Animals, Materials, Biomedicine
  • News

    New antennas are up to a hundredth the size of today’s devices

    Antennas just got a whole lot smaller.

    Tiny chips that communicate via radio waves are a tenth to a hundredth the length of current state-of-the-art compact antennas. At only a couple hundred micrometers across — comparable to the thickness of a piece of paper — these next-gen antennas can relay the same types of signals as those used by TVs, cell phones and radios, researchers report...

    08/22/2017 - 14:00 Technology, Materials
  • News in Brief

    Robot, heal thyself

    A new type of soft robot can go under the knife and make a full recovery in about a day.

    Researchers fashioned a robotic hand, gripper and muscle from self-healing rubbery material. To test their robots’ resilience, the engineers sliced each with a scalpel, then put them in an oven. After cranking up the heat to 80° Celsius, baking the bots for 40 minutes, then cooling them to room...

    08/16/2017 - 14:09 Robotics, Materials
  • 50 years ago, steel got stronger and stretchier

    Ductile, strong steel

    Fundamental scientific knowledge of the behavior of metallic crystals has led to the design of a new series of alloy steels, stronger and tougher than those now available. The new alloys can be stretched from two to five times more than previous ones, yet also have high strength…. The alloys, called TRIP steels, are produced by [the process] Transformation Induced...

    08/10/2017 - 07:00 Materials
  • News in Brief

    Diamond joins the realm of 2-D thin films, study suggests

    Diamonds are going 2-D. The superhard form of carbon can be forged in thin films known as diamondene, new evidence suggests. While graphite, the form of carbon found in pencils, can be made into atom-thick sheets known as graphene, scientists have struggled to create two-dimensional films of its relative, diamond.

    When a pair of graphene sheets are squeezed to pressures around tens of...

    07/31/2017 - 07:00 Materials, Physics
  • Science Ticker

    Slug slime inspires a new type of surgical glue

    View video

    For a glue that holds up inside the body, turn to the humble slug, Arion subfuscus. A new super-sticky material mimics slug slime’s ability to stick on slick wet surfaces and could lead to more effective medical adhesives.

    The material has two parts: a sticky layer that attaches to a surface, and a shock-absorbing layer that reduces strain. That makes the adhesive less...

    07/27/2017 - 14:00 Materials, Biomedicine, Animals
  • News

    The thinnest films of copper look flat, but they aren’t

    Like the surface of an alien planet, thin sheets of copper display a complex topography of ridges and valleys. These never-before-seen undulations may spell trouble for electronic gadgets: The zigzagging surface could contribute to the electrical resistance of miniature copper wires that snake throughout computer chips.

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope, scientists observed nanoscale...

    07/27/2017 - 14:00 Materials
  • Feature

    Perovskites power up the solar industry

    Tsutomu Miyasaka was on a mission to build a better solar cell. It was the early 2000s, and the Japanese scientist wanted to replace the delicate molecules that he was using to capture sunlight with a sturdier, more effective option.

    So when a student told him about an unfamiliar material with unusual properties, Miyasaka had to try it. The material was “very strange,” he says, but he...

    07/26/2017 - 12:00 Materials, Sustainability, Chemistry
  • News

    Chemistry controlled on tiniest scale can create hollow nanoparticles

    Blame oxidation for rusted bridges and browned avocados. But this fundamental process can be harnessed for good, too — and now scientists have scored front-row seats that could show them how.

    Researchers watched at near-atomic resolution as iron nanoparticles transformed into iron oxide — not rust in this case, but related compounds. That closeup view could help scientists better control...

    05/01/2017 - 09:00 Chemistry, Materials