Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Search Content

E.g., 06/19/2018
E.g., 06/19/2018
Your search has returned 6214 images:
  • Asian common toad
  • Venus
  • depressed woman
Your search has returned 110296 articles:
  • Wild Things

    Madagascar’s predators are probably vulnerable to toxic toads

    At some point eight to 10 years ago, some toads stowed away on a ship in Asia, possibly Ho Chi Minh City, and hitched a ride to Madagascar. Those invaders, Asian common toads, have been slowly spreading across the large island ever since.

    The toad’s skin contains a toxin that kills nearly anything that tries to eat the amphibian. Scientists have been warning of the toad’s danger to...

    06/19/2018 - 09:00 Ecology, Animals, Conservation
  • News

    Venus’ thick atmosphere speeds up the planet’s spin

    Time is out of joint on Venus. The planet’s thick air, which spins much faster than the solid globe, may push against the flanks of mountains and change Venus’ rotation rate.

    Computer simulations show that the thick Venusian atmosphere, whipping around the planet at 100 meters per second, exerts enough push against a mountain on one side and suction on the other side to speed the planet’...

    06/18/2018 - 15:44 Planetary Science
  • News

    Phone apps are helping scientists track suicidal thoughts in real time

    Suicide research is undergoing a timing shift, and not a moment too soon. A new breed of studies that track daily — and even hourly — changes in suicidal thinking is providing intriguing, although still preliminary, insights into how to identify those on the verge of trying to kill themselves.

    Monitoring ways in which suicidal thoughts wax and wane over brief time periods, it turns out,...

    06/18/2018 - 09:00 Psychology, Mental Health
  • News

    The most ancient African baobabs are dying and no one knows why

    The last 13 years have been terrible for ancient African baobab trees.

    Nine of the 13 oldest either lost trunks or died altogether after having lived for longer than a millennium, researchers report June 11 in Nature Plants. But just what the demise means for the iconic species is up for debate.

     “Whilst we are saddened about the death and collapse [of the old trees], current...

    06/18/2018 - 07:00 Plants
  • June 23, 2018

    06/15/2018 - 19:09
  • Science Ticker

    The Large Hadron Collider is getting an upgrade

    Smashing together a billion protons a second wasn’t enough for the Large Hadron Collider.

    The particle accelerator, located at CERN in Geneva, is getting spiffed up to allow it to carry out collisions at an even faster rate. On June 15, scientists announced the start of construction for an LHC upgrade called the High-Luminosity LHC.

    The upgrade will boost the collision rate by at...

    06/15/2018 - 14:01 Physics
  • News

    Magnetic fields may be propping up the Pillars of Creation

    The Pillars of Creation may keep standing tall due to the magnetic field within the star-forming region.

    For the first time, scientists have made a detailed map of the magnetic field inside the pillars, made famous by an iconic 1995 Hubble Space Telescope image (SN Online: 1/6/15). The data reveal that the field runs along the length of each pillar, perpendicular to the magnetic field...

    06/15/2018 - 13:21 Astronomy
  • In 1968, scientists thought they were close to detecting gravity waves

    Gravity waves evidence

    The long search for gravitational waves … may be in the final lap…. Rotating binary stars or, perhaps, other galaxies like the Milky Way but far beyond it, or the center of the Milky Way itself, are likely sources for gravitational radiation. — Science News, June 22, 1968.

    Update

    Although Joseph Weber, a physicist at the University of Maryland, announced...

    06/15/2018 - 12:00 Astronomy, Physics
  • Science Stats

    Leaf-cutter ants pick up the pace when they sense rain

    In Central America’s rain-drenched forests, leaf-cutting ants collect pieces of leaves on which they grow fungi for food. But the rain can hit hard, especially for a small ant. When leaf-cutting ants sense an incoming shower, they hoof it back to their nests, says a study in the May Insectes Sociaux.

    Researchers from Argentina, Mexico and Peru tested how one species of leaf-cutting ants...

    06/15/2018 - 07:00 Animals
  • News

    The number of teens who report having sex is down

    Fewer teens are having sex than at any point since 1991, a national survey of U.S. high school students finds. But among those students who are sexually active, fewer are using condoms, raising the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections.

    About 40 percent of teens surveyed in 2017 reported having ever had sex. That’s down from about 54 percent in 1991, the first year the...

    06/14/2018 - 19:04 Health