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Your search has returned 1028 articles:
  • Science & the Public

    No, Kilauea won’t cause mass destruction

    Kilauea isn’t about to become another Krakatoa. So let’s just stop that rumor right there.

    Twitter was awash last weekend in indignant volcanologists responding to a now-corrected Associated Press story that appeared to link the Hawaii volcano to the so-called Ring of Fire, and suggest its eruption could spark others in the ring. That’s just wrong, for a number of reasons.

    The Ring...

    05/16/2018 - 17:02 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Satellite data backs theory of North Korean nuclear site collapse

    A new analysis of satellite images and seismic waves from North Korea’s nuclear test site support theories that the underground facility has at least partially collapsed.

    Seismologists across the world have been tracking the clandestine nuclear weapons program for years by analyzing vibrations that emanate from explosions at the test site under Mount Mantap (SN: 8/5/17, p. 18). Now,...

    05/10/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Science & Society
  • News

    How long will Kilauea’s eruption last?

    Cracks open in the ground. Lava creeps across roads, swallowing cars and homes. Fountains of molten rock shoot up to 70 meters high, catching treetops on fire.

    After a month of rumbling warning signs, Kilauea, Hawaii’s most active volcano, began a new phase of eruption last week. The volcano spewed clouds of steam and ash into the air on May 3, and lava gushed through several new rifts...

    05/08/2018 - 17:16 Earth
  • Science Stats

    Globetrotting tourists are leaving a giant carbon footprint on the Earth

    Going green may mean staying at home.

    Global tourism contributes about 8 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, researchers report May 7 in Nature Climate Change. That carbon footprint is about three times as large as tourism-related emissions estimated by previous studies.

    The jump is largely because the new study doesn’t just tally up emissions from the...

    05/07/2018 - 11:00 Climate, Earth
  • News in Brief

    Last year’s solar eclipse set off a wave in the upper atmosphere

    It was the eclipse felt ‘round the world. The August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse that crossed the United States launched a wave in the upper atmosphere that was detected nearly an hour later from Brazil (SN Online: 8/11/17).

    “The eclipse itself is a local phenomenon, but our study shows that it had effects around the world,” says space scientist Brian Harding of the University of...

    04/30/2018 - 14:43 Planetary Science, Earth
  • News

    Pumping water underground for power may have triggered South Korean quake

    Injecting fluid into the ground for geothermal power generation may have caused the magnitude 5.5 earthquake that shook part of South Korea on November 15, 2017. The liquid, pumped underground by the Pohang power plant, could have triggered a rupture along a nearby fault zone that was already stressed, two new studies suggest.

    If it’s confirmed that the plant is the culprit, the Pohang...

    04/27/2018 - 11:19 Earth
  • News in Brief

    This ancient lizard may have watched the world through four eyes

    About 50 million years ago, a monitor lizard in what is now Wyoming perceived the world through four eyes. Saniwa ensidens is the only known jawed vertebrate to have had two eyelike photosensory structures at the top of the head, in addition to the organs we commonly think of as eyes, researchers report April 2 in Current Biology.

    The structures are called the pineal and parapineal...

    04/05/2018 - 12:19 Paleontology, Earth, Neuroscience
  • News

    Efforts to contain Mississippi floods may have made them worse

    The world’s longest system of levees and floodways, meant to rein in the mighty Mississippi River, may actually make flooding worse.

    Using tree rings and lake sediments, researchers re-created a history of flooding along the lower Mississippi River extending back to the 1500s. This paleoflood record suggests that the past century of river engineering — intended to minimize flood damage...

    04/04/2018 - 14:21 Earth, Climate
  • News

    Seafloor map shows why Greenland’s glaciers melt at different rates

    Greenland is melting rapidly, but some glaciers are disappearing faster than others. A new map of the surrounding seafloor helps explain why: Many of the fastest-melting glaciers sit atop deep fjords that allow Atlantic Ocean water to melt them from below.

    Researchers led by glaciologist Romain Millan of the University of California, Irvine analyzed new oceanographic and topographic data...

    04/03/2018 - 13:02 Climate, Earth, Oceans
  • News

    Powerful New England quake recorded in pond mud

    The history of New England’s most damaging earthquake is written in the mud beneath a Massachusetts pond. Researchers identified the first sedimentary evidence of the Cape Ann earthquake, which in 1755 shook the East Coast from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. The quake, estimated to have been at least magnitude 5.9, took no lives but damaged hundreds of buildings.

    Within a mud core...

    03/27/2018 - 12:48 Earth