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E.g., 10/18/2017
E.g., 10/18/2017
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  • José Dinneny
  • Christina Warinner
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Your search has returned 497 articles:
  • News

    In a first, human embryos edited to explore gene function

    For the first time, researchers have disabled a gene in human embryos to learn about its function.

    Using molecular scissors called CRISPR/Cas9, researchers made crippling cuts in the OCT4 gene, Kathy Niakan and colleagues report September 20 in Nature. The edits revealed a surprising role for the gene in the development of the placenta.

    Researchers commonly delete and disable genes...

    09/20/2017 - 13:24 Genetics, Development, Science & Society
  • The Science Life

    This biochemist brews a wild beer

    Craft brewers are going wild. Some of the trendiest beers on the market are intentionally brewed with yeast scavenged from nature, rather than the carefully cultivated ale or lager yeast used in most commercial beers.

    Matthew Bochman is in on the action. By day, he’s a biochemist at Indiana University Bloomington who studies how cells keep their DNA intact. On the side, he can be found...

    09/19/2017 - 10:00 Microbiology, Genetics, Science & Society
  • Scicurious

    Two artificial sweeteners together take the bitter out of bittersweet

    Artificial sweeteners can have a not-so-sweet side — a bitter aftertaste. The flavor can be such a turnoff that some people avoid the additives entirely. Decades ago, people noticed that for two artificial sweeteners — saccharin and cyclamate, which can taste bitter on their own — the bitterness disappears when they’re combined. But no one really knew why.

    It turns out that saccharin...

    09/14/2017 - 13:30 Genetics
  • Science Ticker

    FDA approves gene therapy to treat a rare cancer

    On August 30, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a novel gene therapy for patients with a rare type of leukemia. This is the first time the agency has greenlighted a gene therapy approach for use in the United States.

    The treatment, called CAR-T immunotherapy, uses genetically engineered T cells, immune system fighters usually tasked with identifying invaders in the body,...

    08/30/2017 - 17:17 Cancer, Genetics
  • News

    Muscle pain in people on statins may have a genetic link

    A new genetics study adds fuel to the debate about muscle aches that have been reported by many people taking popular cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins.

    About 60 percent of people of European descent carry a genetic variant that may make them more susceptible to muscle aches in general. But counterintuitively, these people had a lower risk of muscle pain when they took statins...

    08/30/2017 - 16:55 Genetics, Biomedicine
  • News

    If you’re 35 or younger, your genes can predict whether the flu vaccine will work

    A genetic “crystal ball” can predict whether certain people will respond effectively to the flu vaccine.

    Nine genes are associated with a strong immune response to the flu vaccine in those aged 35 and under, a new study finds. If these genes were highly active before vaccination, an individual would generate a high level of antibodies after vaccination, no matter the flu strain in the...

    08/25/2017 - 14:00 Genetics, Immune Science
  • Science & the Public

    Wild yeasts are brewing up batches of trendy beers

    Craft brewers are going wild. Some of the trendiest beers on the market are intentionally brewed to be sour and funky. One of the hottest new ingredients in the beverages: Yeast scavenged from nature.

    Unlike today’s usual brewing, which typically relies on carefully cultivated ale or lager yeast and rejects outsider microbes, some brewers are returning to beer’s roots. Those beginnings...

    08/25/2017 - 12:30 Microbiology, Genetics, Science & Society
  • News

    The first look at how archaea package their DNA reveals they’re a lot like us

    Single-celled microbes may have taught plants and animals how to pack their genetic baggage.

    Archaea, a type of single-celled life-form similar to bacteria, keep their DNA wrapped around proteins much in the same way as more complex organisms, researchers report in the Aug. 11 Science. This finding provides new insight into the evolutionary origins of the DNA-packing process and the...

    08/10/2017 - 14:00 Genetics, Molecular Evolution
  • News in Brief

    Gene editing creates virus-free piglets

    Pigs are a step closer to becoming organ donors for people.

    Researchers used molecular scissors known as CRISPR/Cas9 to snip embedded viruses out of pig DNA. Removing the viruses — called porcine endogenous retroviruses, or PERVs — creates piglets that can’t pass the viruses on to transplant recipients, geneticist Luhan Yang and colleagues report online August 10 in Science.

    Yang,...

    08/10/2017 - 14:00 Genetics, Biomedicine
  • News

    Gene editing of human embryos gets rid of a mutation that causes heart failure

    For the first time in the United States, researchers have used gene editing to repair a mutation in human embryos.

    Molecular scissors known as CRISPR/Cas9 corrected a gene defect that can lead to heart failure. The gene editor fixed the mutation in about 72 percent of tested embryos, researchers report August 2 in Nature. That repair rate is much higher than expected. Work with skin...

    08/02/2017 - 13:00 Genetics, Cells, Science & Society