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  • News

    Gene editing creates mice with two biological dads for the first time

    For the first time, researchers have created mice with two dads. No female contributed to the rodents’ genetic makeup.

    This unusual reproduction took place in a lab where researchers gathered fathers’ stem cells, and used them to produce embryos that were implanted into surrogate mothers. The technique required scientists to edit the animals’ genes in order for the mice to mature enough...

    10/11/2018 - 12:02 Cells, Development
  • Science Visualized

    See these dazzling images of a growing mouse embryo

    A new microscope is giving researchers an unprecedented view of how mammals are built, cell by cell.

    Light sheet microscopes use ultrathin laser beams to illuminate sections of a specimen while cameras record those lit-up sections. Previous iterations of the device have captured detailed portraits of living zebra fish and fruit fly embryos as they develop. Kate McDole, a developmental...

    10/11/2018 - 11:00 Cells, Development, Animals
  • Science Ticker

    Here’s what’s unusual about Hurricane Michael

    Call it an October surprise: Hurricane Michael strengthened unusually quickly before slamming into the Florida panhandle on October 10 and remained abnormally strong as it swept into Georgia. The storm made landfall with sustained winds of about 250 kilometers per hour, just shy of a category 5 storm, making it the strongest storm ever to hit the region, according to the National Oceanographic...

    10/10/2018 - 17:53 Climate
  • News

    If the past is a guide, Hubble’s new trouble won’t doom the space telescope

    Hubble’s in trouble again.

    The 28-year-old space telescope, in orbit around the Earth, put itself to sleep on October 5 because of an undiagnosed problem with one of its steering wheels. But once more, astronomers are optimistic about Hubble’s chances of recovery. After all, it’s just the latest nail-biting moment in the history of a telescope that has defied all life-expectancy...

    10/10/2018 - 15:03 Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    What bees did during the Great American Eclipse

    When the 2017 Great American Eclipse hit totality and the sky went dark, bees noticed.

    Microphones in flower patches at 11 sites in the path of the eclipse picked up the buzzing sounds of bees flying among blooms before and after totality. But those sounds were noticeably absent during the full solar blackout, a new study finds.

    Dimming light and some summer cooling during the...

    10/10/2018 - 10:00 Animals, Astronomy
  • 50 years ago, a 550-year-old seed sprouted

    550-year-old seed sprouts — 

    A seed of the South America herb achira (Canna sp.), taken from an ancient Indian necklace, has germinated, and the young plant is growing well.… Carbon-14 dating of bones at the site sets the seeds’ age at about 550 years.… The plant from the old seed appeared to have a disturbed gravity orientation, but is still growing fairly normally. — Science News...

    10/10/2018 - 07:00 Plants, Archaeology
  • News

    These light-loving bacteria may survive surprisingly deep underground

    Deep below Earth's surface, life finds a way.

    Traces of cyanobacteria have been found more than 600 meters underground in a rocky outcrop in Spain, suggesting the microbes can survive without sunlight. Instead of photosynthesizing like others of their kind, these light-starved microorganisms may create energy using hydrogen, researchers report October 1 in the Proceedings of the National...

    10/09/2018 - 16:13 Earth, Microbes
  • News in Brief

    Nearly 2 million U.S. adult nonsmokers vape

    Nearly 2 million U.S. adults who have never consistently smoked traditional cigarettes use e-cigarettes, according to results from a national survey. Of these sole e-cig users, about 60 percent are young adults, aged 18 to 24, researchers report online October 9 in Annals of Internal Medicine.

    E-cigarette companies have marketed the devices — which heat and vaporize liquids that...

    10/09/2018 - 13:20 Health
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Sawbones’ invites readers to laugh at the bizarre history of medicine

    The Sawbones BookJustin McElroy and Dr. Sydnee McElroyTeylor Smirl (illustrator)Weldon Owen, $24.99

    Humans took a long, weird road to modern medicine. We don’t have everything figured out yet, but at least we’ve learned not to drink the feces of cholera victims and never to plug dental cavities with a lizard’s liver — unlike some of our ancestors.

    Gruesome methods like these...

    10/09/2018 - 07:00 Health, History of Science, Science & Society
  • News

    How your brain is like a film editor

    The brain’s hippocampi may be the film editors of our lives, slicing our continuous experiences into discrete cuts that can be stored away as memories. That’s the idea raised by a new study that analyzed brain scan data from people watching films such as Forrest Gump.

    “Research like this helps us identify ‘What is an event, from the point of view of the brain?’ ” says memory psychologist...

    10/08/2018 - 13:00 Neuroscience