Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

Support Science Journalism

Science News is a nonprofit.

Support us by subscribing now.

Search Content

E.g., 06/19/2019
E.g., 06/19/2019
Your search has returned 790 images:
  • grid of electrodes
  • vanishing woman
  • kratom supplements
Your search has returned 970 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Testing mosquito pee could help track the spread of diseases

    There are no teensy cups. But a urine test for wild mosquitoes has for the first time proved it can give an early warning that local pests are spreading diseases.

    Mosquito traps remodeled with a pee-collecting card picked up telltale genetic traces of West Nile and two other worrisome viruses circulating in the wild, researchers in Australia report April 4 in the Journal of Medical...

    04/05/2019 - 08:00 Health, Genetics, Animals
  • Reviews & Previews

    In ‘The Perfect Predator,’ viruses vanquish a deadly superbug

    The Perfect PredatorSteffanie Strathdee and Thomas PattersonHachette Books, $28

    Epidemiologist Steffanie Strathdee and her husband, Thomas Patterson, went to Egypt in 2015 expecting to come home with some photos and souvenirs. Instead, Patterson was hit with his own version of the 10 plagues. 

    At first, doctors in Egypt thought Patterson had pancreatitis. But his health...

    04/01/2019 - 09:00 Health, Microbiology, Biomedicine
  • Teaser

    A single-dose antidote may help prevent fentanyl overdoses

    Synthetic opioids outlast current antidotes. A nanoparticle-based alternative could fix that.

    A newly developed single-dose opioid antidote lasts several days, a study in mice shows. If the results can be duplicated in humans, the treatment may one day help prevent overdoses from deadly drugs like fentanyl.

    Normally, a dose of the opioid antidote naloxone passes through a person’s...

    03/31/2019 - 05:00 Health, Chemistry
  • 50 years ago, drug abuse was higher among physicians than the public

    The physician as addict —

    The rate of drug abuse or addiction among physicians is from 30 to 100 times that of the general public.... The American Medical Association estimates that some 60,000 of the country’s 316,000 doctors misuse drugs of various kinds. The drug abuser among physicians has a predisposing personality for addiction, and suffers from overwork and fatigue. Since...

    03/28/2019 - 07:00 Health, Mental Health
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers respond to classroom robots, soil erosion and more

    Robot revolution?

    Educational robots could help students learn new skills and good study habits. But researchers still have a lot to learn about the potential risks involved when young kids keep close company with such robots, Maria Temming reported in “Robots are becoming classroom tutors. But will they make the grade?” (SN: 2/16/19, p. 16).The story reminded reader A. Bogart of Isaac...

    03/27/2019 - 07:00 Robotics, Anthropology, Health
  • News in Brief

    Epileptic seizures may scramble memories during sleep

    SAN FRANCISCO — Seizures during sleep can scramble memories — a preliminary finding that may help explain why people with epilepsy sometimes have trouble remembering.

    The sleeping brain normally rehashes newly learned material, a nocturnal rehearsal that strengthens those memories. Neuroscientist Jessica Creery and her colleagues forced this rehearsal by playing certain sounds while nine...

    03/26/2019 - 13:47 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    Sperm with damaged DNA may cause some repeat miscarriages

    NEW ORLEANS — For couples who have suffered repeated miscarriages, it may be useful to scrutinize the man’s reproductive health as closely as the woman’s. Some miscarriages may be linked to abnormalities in semen, a study finds.  

    Researchers analyzed semen from 49 men whose partners had lost three or more consecutive pregnancies before the 20-week mark. The men had sperm with more than...

    03/26/2019 - 10:43 Health
  • News

    A single sweaty workout may boost some people’s memory

    SAN FRANCISCO — For some older people, the brain boosts from exercise can be almost immediate. Improvements in their thinking abilities after a single 20-minute bout of pedaling a stationary bike mirrored those produced by three months of regular exercise, according to a preliminary study presented March 24 at the annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society. 

    In addition to...

    03/26/2019 - 06:00 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    Edibles are tied to more severe health issues than smoking marijuana

    After Colorado voted to legalize marijuana in 2012, doctors in Denver noticed a surprising trend. Most people who visited the emergency room for cannabis-related complaints had smoked the drug. But those who ingested the drug were more likely to suffer more severe effects, including psychiatric symptoms and heart problems.

    Edibles — marijuana-laced products such as brownies, cookies and...

    03/25/2019 - 17:25 Health
  • News

    Signs of new nerve cells spotted in adult brains

    A tweaked laboratory protocol has revealed signs of thousands of newborn nerve cells in the brains of adults, including an octogenarian. 

    These immature neurons, described online March 25 in Nature Medicine, mark the latest data points in the decades-old debate over whether people’s brains churn out new nerve cells into adulthood. The process, called neurogenesis, happens in the brains...

    03/25/2019 - 12:00 Health, Neuroscience