Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Help us keep you informed.

Real Science. Real News.

Search Content

E.g., 12/18/2018
E.g., 12/18/2018
Your search has returned 280 images:
  • a beagle puppy romping in some grass
  • red, gray and blue pill capsules
  • illustration of RNA
Your search has returned 2156 articles:
  • News

    A new way to make bacteria glow could simplify TB screening

    A new molecule that reveals active tuberculosis bacteria in coughed-up mucus and saliva could simplify TB diagnoses and speed up tests for detecting strains of the disease that are resistant to drugs.

    This synthetic molecule is a modified version of a sugar that TB bacteria consume to help build their cell walls. The sugar is tagged with a dye that lights up under a fluorescent...

    02/28/2018 - 14:03 Microbes, Microbiology, Biomedicine
  • News

    Scientists are tracking how the flu moves through a college campus

    COLLEGE PARK, Md. — Campus life typically challenges students with new opportunities for learning, discovery — and intimacy with germs. Lots of germs.

    That makes dormitories and their residents an ideal natural experiment to trace the germs’ paths. “You pack a bunch of college kids into a very small environment … we’re not known as being the cleanliest of people,” says sophomore Parker...

    02/07/2018 - 07:00 Biomedicine, Health
  • News

    A blood test could predict the risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    A new blood test might reveal whether someone is at risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease.

    The test measures blood plasma levels of a sticky protein called amyloid-beta. This protein can start building up in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients decades before there’s any outward signs of the disease. Typically, it takes a brain scan or spinal tap to discover these A-beta clumps, or plaques,...

    02/01/2018 - 16:03 Neuroscience, Biomedicine, Health
  • News

    Zika may not be the only virus of its kind that can damage a fetus

    Zika virus may not be the black sheep of the family. Infections with either of two related viruses also cause fetal defects in mice, researchers find.

    Some scientists have speculated that Zika’s capacity to harm a fetus might be unique among its kind, perhaps due to a recent change in the virus’s genetic material (SN: 10/28/17, p. 9). Others have argued that perhaps this dangerous...

    01/31/2018 - 14:21 Biomedicine, Health
  • News

    Baby macaques are the first primates to be cloned like Dolly the Sheep

    View the video

    Meet Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, the first primates cloned by reprogramming adult cells.

    Two decades after Dolly the Sheep was successfully cloned (SN: 3/1/97, p. 132), Chinese researchers have used the same technique — somatic cell nuclear transfer — to clone two healthy baby macaque monkeys. The results, reported January 24 in Cell, could lead to more efficient...

    01/24/2018 - 13:30 Genetics, Animals, Biomedicine
  • Science Ticker

    Here’s the key ingredient that lets a centipede’s bite take down prey

    Knocking out an animal 15 times your size — no problem. A newly identified toxin in the venom of a tropical centipede helps the arthropod to overpower giant prey in about 30 seconds.

    Insight into how this venom overwhelms lab mice could lead to an antidote for people who suffer excruciatingly painful, reportedly even fatal, centipede bites, an international research team reports the week...

    01/22/2018 - 17:25 Biomedicine, Animals
  • News

    CRISPR/Cas9 can reverse multiple diseases in mice

    A new twist on gene editing makes the CRISPR/Cas9 molecular scissors act as a highlighter for the genetic instruction book. Such highlighting helps turn on specific genes.

    Using the new tool, researchers treated mouse versions of type 1 diabetes, kidney injury and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the team reports December 7 in Cell. The new method may make some types of gene therapy easier...

    12/07/2017 - 12:25 Genetics, Biomedicine
  • Context

    Philosophical critique exposes flaws in medical evidence hierarchies

    Immanuel Kant was famous for writing critiques.

    He earned his status as the premier philosopher of modern times with such works as Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Practical Reason and Critique of Judgment. It might have been helpful for medical science if he had also written a critique of evidence.

    Scientific research supposedly provides reliable evidence for physicians to...

    11/13/2017 - 14:30 Science & Society, Clinical Trials, Biomedicine
  • News

    Scientists replaced 80 percent of a ‘butterfly’ boy’s skin

    In a last-ditch effort to save a dying 7-year-old boy, scientists have used stem cells and gene therapy to replace about 80 percent of his skin.

    This procedure’s success demonstrates that the combination therapy may be effective against some rare genetic skin disorders. The study also sheds light on how the skin replenishes itself, researchers report November 8 in Nature.

    In 2015,...

    11/08/2017 - 13:35 Genetics, Cells, Biomedicine
  • News

    Artificial insulin-releasing cells may make it easier to manage diabetes

    Artificial cells made from scratch in the lab could one day offer a more effective, patient-friendly diabetes treatment.

    Diabetes, which affects more than 400 million people around the world, is characterized by the loss or dysfunction of insulin-making beta cells in the pancreas. For the first time researchers have created synthetic cells that mimic how natural beta cells sense blood...

    11/03/2017 - 12:00 Biomedicine, Technology