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E.g., 03/30/2017
E.g., 03/30/2017
Your search has returned 1270 images:
  • MAVEN probe
  • phytoplankton blooms and diatoms
  • a backwards asteroid orbit
Your search has returned 4659 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Extreme gas loss dried out Mars, MAVEN data suggest

    The Martian atmosphere definitely had more gas in the past.

    Data from NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft indicate that the Red Planet has lost most of the gas that ever existed in its atmosphere. The results, published in the March 31 Science, are the first to quantify how much gas has been lost with time and offer clues to how Mars went from a warm, wet place to a cold, dry one.

    Mars is...

    03/30/2017 - 14:46 Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Thinning ice creates undersea Arctic greenhouses

    Sea ice skylights formed by warming Arctic temperatures increasingly allow enough sunlight into the waters below to spur phytoplankton blooms, new research suggests. Such conditions, probably a rarity more than two decades ago, now extend to roughly 30 percent of the ice-covered Arctic Ocean during July, researchers report March 29 in Science Advances.

    The microscopic critters need...

    03/29/2017 - 14:00 Oceans, Ecosystems, Climate
  • How Bizarre

    Asteroid in Jupiter's orbit goes its own way

    View the video

    One of Jupiter’s companions is a bit of a nonconformist.

    The gas giant shares its orbit around the sun with a slew of asteroids, but scientists have now discovered one that goes against the flow. It journeys around the solar system in reverse — in the opposite direction of Jupiter and all the other planets. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 is the first object found that orbits in...

    03/29/2017 - 13:00 Astronomy
  • Growth Curve

    Don’t put greasy Q-tips up your kid’s nose, and other nosebleed advice

    Ever since she was a baby, my older daughter has periodically endured massive nosebleeds. When she was 10 months old, I walked into her room to pick her up after her nap. There, I was greeted with a baby happily standing in what appeared to be a sea of ruby red blood. Her busy little hands had smeared blood all over the crib and wall. The sight haunts me still. 

    My daughter’s very calm...

    03/28/2017 - 07:00 Health, Human Development
  • Growth Curve

    Touches early in life may make a big impact on newborn babies’ brains

    Many babies born early spend extra time in the hospital, receiving the care of dedicated teams of doctors and nurses. For these babies, the hospital is their first home. And early experiences there, from lights to sounds to touches, may influence how babies develop.

    Touches early in life in the NICU, both pleasant and not, may shape how a baby’s brain responds to gentle touches later, a...

    03/22/2017 - 12:30 Human Development, Health
  • News

    How Pluto’s haze could explain its red spots

    Pluto may get its smattering of red spots from the fallout of its hazy blue skies, researchers say.

    Haze particles from the dwarf planet’s atmosphere settle onto all of Pluto’s surfaces. But some regions may become redder and darker than others because parts of the atmosphere collapse, exposing those spots to more surface-darkening radiation from space, researchers report March 22 at the...

    03/22/2017 - 09:41 Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Close pass by sun didn’t radically alter comet 67P’s landscape

    At least one of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s dusty outbursts was the result of a landslide. But such changes to the surface of the comet haven’t radically altered its appearance, suggesting it has had roughly the same look for decades — or longer.

    Images from the Rosetta spacecraft taken before its demise show what happened to the comet as it passed close to the sun in 2015. Cliffs...

    03/21/2017 - 10:30 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Life on Earth may have begun as dividing droplets

    NEW ORLEANS — In a primordial soup on ancient Earth, droplets of chemicals may have paved the way for the first cells. Shape-shifting droplets split, grow and split again in new computer simulations. The result indicates that simple chemical blobs can exhibit replication, one of the most basic properties of life, physicist Rabea Seyboldt of the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex...

    03/21/2017 - 07:00 Biophysics, Chemistry
  • Feature

    Smartphones may be changing the way we think

    Not too long ago, the internet was stationary. Most often, we’d browse the Web from a desktop computer in our living room or office. If we were feeling really adventurous, maybe we’d cart our laptop to a coffee shop. Looking back, those days seem quaint.

    Today, the internet moves through our lives with us. We hunt Pokémon as we shuffle down the sidewalk. We text at red lights. We tweet...

    03/17/2017 - 12:21 Neuroscience, Health
  • News

    Remnants of Earth’s original crust preserve time before plate tectonics

    Not all of the newborn Earth’s surface has been lost to time. Transformed bits of this rocky material remain embedded in the hearts of continents, new research suggests. These lingering remnants hint that full-fledged plate tectonics, the movements of large plates of Earth’s outer shell, began relatively late in the planet’s history, researchers report in the March 17 Science.

    These...

    03/16/2017 - 14:00 Earth