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Your search has returned 28 images:
  • illustration of Amasia
  • Ozone hole
Your search has returned 366 articles:
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers amazed by Amasia

    Saved by the Bell

    Physicists used light from stars to perform a cosmic Bell test, which verified that quantum particles were indeed “spooky,” Emily Conover reported in “Quantum effect passes space test” (SN: 1/21/17, p. 12).

    Reader George Mitchell took issue with Conover’s description of entangled photons before they are measured as having multiple polarizations at once. “We don’t know...

    02/22/2017 - 12:43 Quantum Physics, Earth, Technology
  • Awards

    20162016 Folio: AwardsBest single article, Consumer, Science, Gene Drives Unleashed, Tina Hesman Saey (Dec. 12, 2015 issue).Best series of articles, Consumer, Science, The discovery of gravitational waves. Physicists Detect Gravitational Waves – LIGO experiment reports first detection of spacetime vibrations, opening new window to the cosmos.Listening for Gravity Waves – News from Advanced LIGO...
    01/30/2017 - 18:54
  • Editor's Note

    Mapping the future of continents and batteries

    The Earth is always moving beneath our feet. What seems permanent, still and solid is in fact constantly creeping. It’s easy to forget that as we race through our busy days, measuring time with digital clocks rather than the achingly slow beat of rock.

    In "Evidence falls into place for once and future supercontinents", contributing correspondent Alexandra Witze explores the long-term...

    01/11/2017 - 12:18 Earth, Technology, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Evidence falls into place for once and future supercontinents

    Look at any map of the Atlantic Ocean, and you might feel the urge to slide South America and Africa together. The two continents just beg to nestle next to each other, with Brazil’s bulge locking into West Africa’s dimple. That visible clue, along with several others, prompted Alfred Wegener to propose over a century ago that the continents had once been joined in a single enormous landmass....

    01/11/2017 - 08:38 Earth
  • Feature

    Year in review: Ozone hole officially on the mend

    In a rare bright spot for global environmental news, atmospheric scientists reported in 2016 that the ozone hole that forms annually over Antarctica is beginning to heal. Their data nail the case that the Montreal Protocol, the international treaty drawn up in 1987 to limit the use of ozone-destroying chemicals, is working.

    The Antarctic ozone hole forms every Southern Hemisphere spring...

    12/14/2016 - 07:34 Earth, Climate, Pollution, Science & Society
  • Editor's Note

    2016 Nobels: Science News fans read it here first

    This year’s Nobel Prizes honored scientific achievements that dedicated Science News readers (with good memories) would have found familiar. A dive into our archives revealed some interesting results.

    The physiology or medicine prize recognized autophagy, the cellular process by which living cells dispose of — or recycle — their biochemical garbage. Molecular biology writer Tina Hesman...

    10/19/2016 - 16:37 Science & Society
  • Feature

    Tenio Popmintchev fits X-ray laser on a tabletop

    Tenio Popmintchev, 39Laser physicistUniversity of Colorado Boulder

    Experimental physics is not for the fainthearted. One tiny error — or a concatenation of many — can keep a complicated experiment from working smoothly. Fortunately, Tenio Popmintchev has the tenacity for it.

    Popmintchev, a laser physicist at the JILA institute at the University of Colorado Boulder, thinks nothing...

    09/21/2016 - 11:03 Physics, Technology
  • News

    Where the young hot Earth cached its gold

    There’s a new twist to the story of how Earth’s most precious metals, including gold and platinum, got to where they are in the planet.

    Some 4.6 billion years ago, space rocks pummeling the infant Earth kept it hot and molten. As the nascent planet grew bigger, a new study suggests, the heat and pressure kept precious metals trapped within its upper layers rather than allowing them to...

    09/08/2016 - 14:00 Earth, Chemistry
  • Editor's Note

    Science finds many tricks for traveling to the past

    Talking about her cover story on what iron-loving elements are telling geologists about the Earth’s deep past, Alexandra Witze likens these rare metals to time travelers. They can tell you, she says, what was happening more than 4.5 billion years ago, during the first 50 million years of our planet’s existence. By then the Earth’s molten interior had begun to settle into its current layer cake...

    07/27/2016 - 16:14 Earth, Evolution, Cosmology
  • Feature

    Iron-loving elements tell stories of Earth’s history

    View the slideshow

    Four and a half billion years ago, after Earth’s fiery birth, the infant planet began to radically reshape itself, separating into distinct layers. Metals — mostly iron with a bit of nickel — fell toward the center to form a core. The growing core also vacuumed up other metallic elements, such as platinum, iridium and gold.

    By the time the core finished forming,...

    07/27/2016 - 07:00 Earth, Chemistry