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Your search has returned 7 images:
  • Saturn's ring system
  • map of Earth
  • cyanobacteria
Your search has returned 380 articles:
  • 50 Years Ago

    50 years ago, an Earth-based telescope spotted Saturn’s fourth ring

    Saturn: Four Rings

    Walter A. Feibelman of the University of Pittsburgh … has found evidence indicating a fourth ring [of Saturn].… Every 14.78 years, the rings of Saturn can be seen edge-on from Earth, and the past winter marked one of these opportunities.… The thin ring “extends to more than twice the known ring diameter” (or a total of 340,000 miles), and is so faint it cannot be...

    05/18/2017 - 07:00 Planetary Science
  • 50 Years Ago

    50 years ago, continental drift began to gain acceptance

    Drifting theories shake up geology

    Continental drift, a theory often considered amusing but rarely important, seems about to become the focus of a revolution in geology. At the least, it has already split the geological community into those who find the evidence for it “formidable” and those who think it is not yet formidable enough to constitute a proof. — Science News, April 29, 1967...

    04/20/2017 - 09:00 Earth
  • 50 Years Ago

    Origin of photosynthesis may go further back than estimates from 50 years ago

    Evidence of Precambrian life

    From deep in the gold mines of South Africa’s Orange Free State has come evidence that there was some form of biologic activity on Earth at least 2.15 billion years ago. Polymerized hydrocarbon “chemo-fossils” found in the gold ores … [probably] were originally part of a rich bacterial and algal life in the Witwatersrand basin. Since the rock layers from...

    03/02/2017 - 12:00 Evolution, Microbes
  • News

    Newly identified continent Zealandia faces a battle for recognition

    Lurking beneath New Zealand is a long-hidden continent called Zealandia, geologists say. But since nobody is in charge of officially designating a new continent, individual scientists will ultimately have to judge for themselves.

    A team of geologists pitches the scientific case for the new continent in the March/April issue of GSA Today, arguing that Zealandia is a continuous expanse of...

    02/24/2017 - 06:00 Earth
  • Feature

    When a nearby star goes supernova, scientists will be ready

    Almost every night that the constellation Orion is visible, physicist Mark Vagins steps outside to peer at a reddish star at the right shoulder of the mythical figure. “You can see the color of Betelgeuse with the naked eye. It’s very striking, this red, red star,” he says. “It may not be in my lifetime, but one of these days, that star is going to explode.”

    With a radius about 900 times...

    02/08/2017 - 08:00 Astronomy, Physics
  • 50 Years Ago

    Saturn’s 10th moon was the first satellite discovered in the modern space age

    Tenth moon of Saturn

    The first natural satellite in the solar system to be discovered since artificial satellites were launched has been found circling Saturn. Dr. Audouin Dollfus of the Observatory of Physical Astronomy at Meudon, France, spotted Saturn’s tenth satellite on three photographs taken in mid-December when the planet’s rings were seen edge-on from earth. — Science News,...

    01/05/2017 - 10:00 Astronomy
  • Feature

    Celebrating 25 years of the Hubble Space Telescope

    View slideshow • View video

    On a chilly Saturday evening in March, unfazed by more than 6 inches of new snow, hundreds of people crowded into Shriver Hall at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore to hear the East Coast premiere of “Cosmic Dust,” an orchestral piece set to images of deep space. A trumpet fanfare conveyed the immense power of an exploding star; a cascade from the violins...

    04/07/2015 - 14:15 Astronomy
  • Feature

    Infrasonic Symphony

    "Let me start off with a riddle," says NASA scientist Allan J. Zuckerwar. In his office in Hampton, Va., he rattles off items as dissimilar as rhinoceroses, supersonic aircraft, and hurricanes. "Now, what do they have in common?" The answer, Zuckerwar explains, is that each one generates silent infrasound—long sound waves at a frequency below 20 hertz. People can't hear anything below that...

    01/03/2004 - 14:55 Earth
  • Feature

    Volume Information

    12/18/1999 - 00:00
  • Feature

    Unraveling the Mystery of Melanin

    09/18/1999 - 00:00