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E.g., 03/23/2017
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Your search has returned 13941 articles:
  • 50 Years Ago

    In 1967, LSD was briefly labeled a breaker of chromosomes

    LSD may damage chromosomes

    Two New York researchers have found the hallucinogenic drug will markedly increase the rate of abnormal change in chromosomes. [Scientists] tested LSD on cell cultures from the blood of two healthy individuals … [and] also found similar abnormal changes in the blood of a schizophrenic patient who had been treated with [LSD]. The cell cultures showed a two-fold...

    03/23/2017 - 07:00 Genetics, Neuroscience
  • News

    Astronomers detect oldest known stardust in distant galaxy

    Astronomers may have spotted some of the earliest stardust ever created in the cosmos.

    Astrophysicist Nicolas Laporte of University College London and colleagues detected the dust in a galaxy seen as it was when the universe was only 600 million years old. “We are probably seeing the first stardust of the universe,” Laporte says. The observations, published online March 8 in the...

    03/08/2017 - 06:00 Astronomy, Cosmology
  • 50 Years Ago

    Germanium computer chips gain ground on silicon — again

    First germanium integrated circuits

    Integrated circuits made of germanium instead of silicon have been reported … by researchers at International Business Machines Corp. Even though the experimental devices are about three times as large as the smallest silicon circuits, they reportedly offer faster overall switching speed. Germanium … has inherently greater mobility than silicon, which...

    02/09/2017 - 11:00 Materials, Computing
  • News

    Snooze patterns vary across cultures, opening eyes to evolution of sleep

    Hunter-gatherers and farming villagers who live in worlds without lightbulbs or thermostats sleep slightly less at night than smartphone-toting city slickers, researchers say.

    “Contrary to conventional wisdom, people in societies without electricity do not sleep more than those in industrial societies like ours,” says UCLA psychiatrist and sleep researcher Jerome Siegel, who was not...

    01/27/2017 - 13:42 Anthropology, Evolution
  • Science Ticker

    In some ways, hawks hunt like humans

    A hunter’s gaze betrays its strategy. And looking at what an animal looks at when it's hunting for prey has revealed foraging patterns in humans, other primates — and now, birds. 

    Suzanne Amador Kane of Haverford College in Pennsylvania and her colleagues watched archival footage of three raptor species hunting: northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis), Cooper’s hawks (A. cooperii) and red...

    11/17/2016 - 10:57 Animals
  • Editor's Note

    2016 Nobels: Science News fans read it here first

    This year’s Nobel Prizes honored scientific achievements that dedicated Science News readers (with good memories) would have found familiar. A dive into our archives revealed some interesting results.

    The physiology or medicine prize recognized autophagy, the cellular process by which living cells dispose of — or recycle — their biochemical garbage. Molecular biology writer Tina Hesman...

    10/19/2016 - 16:37 Science & Society
  • News

    Sugar industry sought to sugarcoat causes of heart disease

    Using records unearthed from library storage vaults, researchers recently revealed that the sugar industry paid nutrition experts from Harvard University to downplay studies linking sugar and heart disease. Although the incident happened in the 1960s, it appears to have helped redirect the scientific narrative for decades.

    The documents — which include correspondence, symposium programs...

    09/25/2016 - 09:00 Health, Science & Society, Nutrition
  • News

    See where Clinton and Trump stand on science

    Hillary Clinton’s “I believe in science” declaration aside, science has not played a starring role in the 2016 presidential election. Far from it. For the most part, the candidates’ science policies have trickled out in dribs and drabs, and in varying degrees of detail — talking points on a website here, a passing comment in response to a spur-of-the-moment question there.

    Yet science...

    09/13/2016 - 12:25 Science & Society
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers ponder gravity wave physics

    Gaga for gravity waves

    With a single chirp, scientists confirmed the existence of gravitational waves created by the collision of two black holes. Science News’ special report (SN: 3/5/16) and subsequent stories in the March 19 issue sparked a flurry of reader questions on the physics of gravitational waves.

    Reader Peter Toot wondered if gravitational waves’ ability to bend spacetime...

    05/04/2016 - 16:13 Particle Physics, Health
  • The –est

    This eclipse goes on and on

    Once every 69 years, a nearby star dramatically dims for about three and a half years during the longest known stellar eclipse in our galaxy.

    The star, called TYC 2505-672-1, is a red giant, about 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Leo Minor. The star is orbited by a dim, hot companion star that appears to be enveloped by a thick cloud of dust roughly one to three times as wide...

    03/30/2016 - 12:12 Astronomy