Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

REAL SCIENCE. REAL NEWS.

Help us keep you informed.

Support Science News.

Search Content

E.g., 11/20/2018
E.g., 11/20/2018
Your search has returned 6529 images:
  • parent talking to kid in time out
  • person holding phone illustrated with twitter notifications
  • Dead Sea
Your search has returned 106295 articles:
  • Growth Curve

    Don’t spank your kids. Do time-outs and positive talk instead, pediatricians say

    Sometime around 9 p.m., before the second leg of a cross-country flight, my just-turned-4-year-old decided she had had enough. She let out a scream and went full noodle right at the end of a moving walkway in Chicago Midway. I had the baby in a carrier and a death grip on my older daughter’s hand, so it was up to my husband to scoop up our enraged, sweaty middle child and keep hold of her and...

    11/20/2018 - 14:00 Parenting, Guidelines
  • News

    How Twitter bots get people to spread fake news

    To spread misinformation like wildfire, bots will strike a match on social media but then urge people to fan the flames.

    Automated Twitter accounts, called bots, helped spread bogus articles during and after the 2016 U.S. presidential election by making the content appear popular enough that human users would trust it and share it more widely, researchers report online November 20 in...

    11/20/2018 - 11:00 Robotics, Science & Society
  • News in Brief

    An exploding meteor may have wiped out ancient Dead Sea communities

    DENVER — A superheated blast from the skies obliterated cities and farming settlements north of the Dead Sea around 3,700 years ago, preliminary findings suggest.

    Radiocarbon dating and unearthed minerals that instantly crystallized at high temperatures indicate that a massive airburst caused by a meteor that exploded in the atmosphere instantaneously destroyed civilization in a 25-...

    11/20/2018 - 10:00 Archaeology
  • News

    Nuclear ‘knots’ could unravel the mysteries of atoms

    Knotlike structures called skyrmions might help scientists untangle the inner workings of atomic nuclei, a new study suggests.

    A skyrmion is a tiny disturbance in a substance, a swirling pattern that, like a knot, is difficult to undo. In the 1960s, nuclear physicist Tony Skyrme suggested that these structures — since named after him — could represent protons and neutrons within a...

    11/20/2018 - 06:00 Particle Physics
  • News in Brief

    NASA’s Mars 2020 rover will look for ancient life in a former river delta

    The next NASA Mars rover will hunt for signs of ancient life in what used to be a river delta, the agency announced on November 19.

    The rover is expected to launch in July 2020 and to land on Mars around February 18, 2021. It will seek out signs of past life in the sediments and sands of Jezero crater, which was once home to a 250-meter-deep lake and a river delta that flowed into the...

    11/19/2018 - 15:36 Planetary Science, Astrobiology
  • News

    A Bronze Age tomb in Israel reveals the earliest known use of vanilla

    DENVER — Three jugs placed as offerings in a roughly 3,600-year-old tomb in Israel have revealed a sweet surprise — evidence of the oldest known use of vanilla.

    Until now, vanilla was thought to have originated in Mexico, perhaps 1,000 years ago or more. But jugs from the Bronze Age site of Megiddo contain remnants of two major chemical compounds in natural vanilla extract, vanillin and...

    11/19/2018 - 12:49 Archaeology
  • News in Brief

    Gut bacteria may guard against diabetes that comes with aging

    Losing one variety of gut bacteria may lead to type 2 diabetes as people age.

    Old mice have less Akkermansia muciniphila bacteria than young mice do, researchers report November 14 in Science Translational Medicine. That loss triggers inflammation, which eventually leads cells to ignore signals from the hormone insulin. Such disregard for insulin’s message to take in glucose is known as...

    11/19/2018 - 10:55 Microbiology, Physiology, Immune Science
  • News

    Hemp fields offer a late-season pollen source for stressed bees

    VANCOUVER — Fields of hemp might become a late-season pollen bonanza for bees.

    Industrial hemp plants, the no-high varieties of cannabis, are becoming a more familiar sight for American bees as states create pilot programs for legal growing. Neither hemp nor the other strains of the Cannabis sativa species grown for recreational or medicinal uses offer insects any nectar, and all rely on...

    11/19/2018 - 06:00 Animals, Conservation, Agriculture
  • Mystery Solved

    Wombats are the only animals whose poop is a cube. Here’s how they do it.

    Of all the poops in the world, only wombats’ are shaped like cubes.

    The varied elasticity of the wombat’s intestines helps the marsupials to sculpt their scat into cubelike nuggets, instead of the round pellets, messy piles or tubular coils made by other mammals, researchers reported November 18 at the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting in Atlanta.

    Wombats...

    11/18/2018 - 17:00 Animals
  • News

    Small doses of peanut protein can turn allergies around

    Carefully calibrated doses of peanut protein can turn extreme allergies around. At the end of a year of slowly increasing exposure, most children who started off severely allergic could eat the equivalent of two peanuts.

    That reversal, reported November 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine, “will be considered life-transforming for many families with a peanut allergy,” says...

    11/18/2018 - 16:45 Health