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Your search has returned 28 articles:
  • News

    Stone-tool makers reached North Africa and Arabia surprisingly early

    Ancient stone-tool makers spread into largely unstudied parts of North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula surprisingly early, two new studies find. Discoveries in Algeria and Saudi Arabia underscore how toolmaking traditions enabled Stone Age Homo groups to travel long distances and adapt to different environments, researchers say.

    Hominids used simple cutting and chopping implements to...

    11/29/2018 - 14:00 Archaeology, Human Evolution
  • Feature

    With dinosaurs out of the way, mammals had a chance to thrive

    For dinosaurs, the end of the world began in fire.

    The space rock that stamped a Vermont-sized crater into the Earth 66 million years ago packed a powerful punch. Any animal living within about a thousand miles of the impact zone was probably vaporized, says paleontologist Stephen Brusatte of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

    “Everything would have been toast.”

    But...

    01/25/2017 - 14:30 Paleontology, Evolution, Animals
  • Feature

    Evidence falls into place for once and future supercontinents

    Look at any map of the Atlantic Ocean, and you might feel the urge to slide South America and Africa together. The two continents just beg to nestle next to each other, with Brazil’s bulge locking into West Africa’s dimple. That visible clue, along with several others, prompted Alfred Wegener to propose over a century ago that the continents had once been joined in a single enormous landmass....

    01/11/2017 - 08:38 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Picture of primate common ancestor coming into focus

    SALT LAKE CITY — The earliest primate was a tiny, solitary tree dweller that liked the night life. Those are just some conclusions from new reconstructions of the primate common ancestor, presented October 27 at the annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

    Eva Hoffman, now a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin, and colleagues at Yale University looked...

    10/29/2016 - 07:00 Paleontology, Anthropology
  • News

    Fossils hint at India’s crucial role in primate evolution

    Remarkably preserved bones of rat-sized creatures excavated in an Indian coal mine may come from close relatives of the first primatelike animals, researchers say.

    A set of 25 arm, leg, ankle and foot fossils, dating to roughly 54.5 million years ago, raises India’s profile as a possible hotbed of early primate evolution, say evolutionary biologist Rachel Dunn of Des Moines University in...

    09/08/2016 - 09:00 Evolution, Paleontology, Anthropology
  • News

    Hints of earlier human exit from Africa

    Stone Age people apparently took a surprisingly fast track out of Africa via an unexpected route — Arabia. Modern humans reached Arabia’s eastern edge, not far from the shores of southwestern Asia, as early as 125,000 years ago, according to a report in the Jan. 28 Science. That’s a good 65,000 years earlier than the generally accepted date for the first substantial human migrations beyond...

    01/27/2011 - 16:36 Humans & Society, Archaeology, Anthropology
  • Feature

    2009 Science News of the Year: Earth

    Feathered dinosaur predates oldest birdPaleontologists have unearthed a long-sought treasure — evidence of a feathered dinosaur older than Archaeopteryx, the 150-million-year-old creature often considered to be the first known bird (SN: 10/24/09, p. 8). The newly described species, the peacock-sized Anchiornis huxleyi, lived in what is now northeastern China between 151 million and...

    12/18/2009 - 16:58 Earth
  • Feature

    Cold Panacea

    It was like the cavalry had shown up.Twenty years ago, newspapers and broadcasters burst with news from the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City delivering what seemed a miracle. Its name was cold fusion. Its lure was simple: inexhaustible, clean and affordable energy.A news conference is not a very professional way to introduce scientists to a major development in a field they’...

    02/27/2009 - 13:39
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2006

    What's in a Name?

    Anthropology & Archaeology

    Astronomy

    Behavior

    Biomedicine

    Botany & Zoology

    Cell & Molecular Biology

    ...
    12/20/2006 - 08:59 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2005

    Science News of Yesteryear

    Anthropology & Archaeology

    Astronomy

    Behavior

    Biomedicine

    Botany & Zoology

    Cell & Molecular...

    12/20/2005 - 03:53 Humans & Society