Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

SCIENCE NEWS NEEDS YOU

Support nonprofit journalism

Subscribe now

Search Content

E.g., 03/20/2019
E.g., 03/20/2019
Your search has returned 12 images:
  • Vredefort
  • Hurricane Florence
  • mounds in the rock record
Your search has returned 87 articles:
  • Science Visualized

    Erosion has erased most of Earth’s impact craters. Here are the survivors

    When it comes to impact craters, Earth is the pauper of the solar system.

    Even with a recent, still-to-be-confirmed crater discovery under Greenland’s ice, there are fewer than 200 known impact craters on the planet. Mars, for comparison, has hundreds of thousands.

    Produced by falling space rocks, most impact craters on Earth have been wiped away over time by wind, rain, shifting...

    12/18/2018 - 06:00 Earth
  • Feature

    Top 10 stories of 2018: Climate change, gene-edited babies, hidden craters and more

    In 2018, we saw just how much power science has to make a real impact. 

    Science News’ top stories of the year include a literal impact — the hidden contours of what appears to be a massive crater created when a meteorite slammed into Greenland long ago. That discovery ranks among our Top 10 partly because it’s just cool, but also because it raises the tantalizing prospect of solving a...

    12/17/2018 - 08:36 Science & Society
  • News

    These ancient mounds may not be the earliest fossils on Earth after all

    Tiny mounds touted as the earliest fossilized evidence of life on Earth may just be twisted rock.

    Found in 3.7-billion-year-old rocks in Greenland, the mounds strongly resemble cone-shaped microbial mats called stromatolites, researchers reported in 2016. But a new analysis of the shape, internal layers and chemistry of the structures suggests that the mounds weren’t shaped by microbes...

    10/17/2018 - 13:00 Earth, Paleontology, Microbes
  • Feature

    When bogs burn, the environment takes a hit

    In 2015, massive wildfires burned through Indonesia, sending thick smoke and haze as far as Thailand.

    These fires were “the worst environmental disaster in modern history,” says Thomas Smith, a wildfire expert at King’s College London. Smith estimates that the fires and smoke killed 100,000 people in Indonesia and neighboring countries and caused billions of...

    03/06/2018 - 12:00 Ecosystems, Climate, Agriculture
  • News

    Oldest microfossils suggest life thrived on Earth about 4 billion years ago

    Tiny, iron-rich fossils exhumed from the depths of an ancient ocean could reveal the cradle of life.

    These micrometer-scale structures are probably remnants of microorganisms that once lived amidst ancient hydrothermal vents, researchers suggest March 1 in Nature.

    “In a nutshell, what we’ve found are the oldest microfossils on Earth,” says study coauthor Matthew Dodd, a...

    03/01/2017 - 13:00 Paleontology, Microbes
  • Feature

    These 2016 stories could be really big — if they're true

    These findings would have rocked the scientific world, if only the evidence had been more convincing.

    New Planet 9 clues

    A giant planet lurking at the outskirts of the solar system could explain the odd orbits of far-flung hunks of icy debris (SN: 2/20/16, p. 6). If the planet exists, its average distance from the sun would be between 500 and 600 times Earth’s distance (SN: 7/23/16, p. 7...

    12/23/2016 - 10:00 Astronomy, Cells, Evolution
  • The –est

    Greenland may be home to Earth’s oldest fossils

    A melting snow patch in Greenland has revealed what could be the oldest fossilized evidence of life on Earth. The 3.7-billion-year-old structures may help scientists retrace the rise of the first organisms relatively soon after Earth’s formation around 4.5 billion years ago (SN: 2/8/14, p. 16), the discoverers report online August 31 in Nature.

    Unlike dinosaur bones, the new fossils are...

    08/31/2016 - 13:00 Paleontology, Microbes
  • News

    Warming culprit CO2 has a cool side — and it’s in Antarctica

    In a cold corner of the world, carbon dioxide is doing something surprising. Instead of causing warming, rising CO2 levels over central Antarctica produce a net cooling effect, new research suggests.

    That discovery does not undermine the fact that accumulating greenhouse gases raise temperatures elsewhere around the world (SN: 4/4/15, p. 14), the researchers say. The effect is instead a...

    12/04/2015 - 07:00 Climate
  • Feature

    Climbing high to save a threatened West Coast plant

    Protruding from a cliff face, a diminutive desert plant peered across a sapphire channel as flames charred the earth hundreds of feet below. The remote pinnacle should have protected the onlooker, as it had in the past, but the blaze was too hot. This time, the mountain burned, and the tiny succulent, known as Verity’s liveforever, wilted and died.

    As the May 2013 Camarillo Springs fire...

    10/03/2014 - 14:06 Plants
  • Feature

    Life’s early traces

    Western Australia’s Pilbara region isn’t known for its hospitality to life. Dry creek beds carve paths through dusty red earth, and razor-sharp grasses cover the area’s low hills. In this place with record-setting heat and months of minimal rainfall, hardy plants and animals eke out an existence.

    But the Pilbara may have been prime real estate for the planet’s earliest complex life-forms...

    01/24/2014 - 14:50 Earth, Evolution