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E.g., 04/27/2017
E.g., 04/27/2017
Your search has returned 715 images:
  • Saturn's atmosphere
  • dolphin flinging an octopus
  • Cassini and Saturn
Your search has returned 14962 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Cassini’s ring dive offers first close-up of Saturn’s cloud tops

    Cassini has beamed back stunning images from the spacecraft’s daring dive between Saturn and its rings.

    The first closeup pictures of the planet’s atmosphere reveal peculiar threadlike clouds and puffy cumulus ones, plus the giant hurricane first spotted on Saturn in 2008 (SN: 11/8/08, p. 9). Released April 27, the images of Saturn’s cloud tops are a “big step forward” for understanding...

    04/27/2017 - 17:49 Planetary Science
  • Wild Things

    How a dolphin eats an octopus without dying

    Most people who eat octopus prefer it immobile, cut into pieces and nicely grilled or otherwise cooked. For some, though, the wiggly, sucker-covered arms of a live octopus are a treat — even though those arms can stick to the throat and suffocate the diner if they haven’t been chopped into small enough pieces.

    Dolphins risk the same fate when eating octopus — and they can’t cook it or...

    04/25/2017 - 13:00 Animals
  • Science Ticker

    In ‘grand finale,’ Cassini spacecraft sets off on collision course with Saturn

    View the animation

    Cassini is bravely going where no spacecraft has gone before — between Saturn and its rings.

    The probe, which launched in 1997 and has orbited Saturn since 2004, starts this daring expedition April 22. It will fly through the 2,400-kilometer-wide gap between Saturn and its rings 22 times before plunging into the planet’s atmosphere and burning up on Sept. 15....

    04/21/2017 - 07:00 Planetary Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers bugged by wine-spoiling stinkbugs

    Eau de stinkbug

    Stinkbugs accidentally harvested with grapes and fermented during the wine­making process release a pungent stress compound. It takes only three stinkbugs per grape cluster to ruin red wine’s taste, Elizabeth S. Eaton reported in “Red wine has stinkbug threshold” (SN: 3/18/17, p. 5).

    “Does contamination of wine by the bugs’ stress compound pose any health risk to...

    04/19/2017 - 11:49 Animals
  • Wild Things

    Improbable ‘black swan’ events can devastate animal populations

    Sometimes, the improbable happens. The stock market crashes. A big earthquake shakes a city. A nuclear power plant has a meltdown. These seemingly unpredictable, rare incidents — dubbed black swan events — may be unlikely to happen on any specific day, but they do occur. And even though they may be rare, we take precautions. A smart investor balances their portfolio. A California homeowner...

    04/17/2017 - 09:00 Animals, Conservation
  • Mystery Solved

    Hawk moths convert nectar into antioxidants

    Hawk moths have a sweet solution to muscle damage.

    Manduca sexta moths dine solely on nectar, but the sugary liquid does more than fuel their bodies. The insects convert some of the sugars into antioxidants that protect the moths’ hardworking muscles, researchers report in the Feb. 17 Science.

    When animals expend a lot of energy, like hawk moths do as they rapidly beat their wings...

    04/17/2017 - 07:00 Ecology, Microbiology
  • Science Ticker

    Size matters to lizards, but numbers may not

    The quantitative abilities of lizards may have their limits.

    From horses to salamanders, lots of different species display some form of number sense, but the phenomenon hasn’t been investigated in reptiles. So a team of researchers in Italy set up two experiments for 27 ruin lizards (Podarcis sicula) collected from walls on the University of Ferrara’s campus. In the first test, the team ...

    04/14/2017 - 16:00 Animals, Evolution
  • News

    Shock-absorbing spear points kept early North Americans on the hunt

    Ancient North Americans hunted with spear points crafted to absorb shock.

    Clovis people, who crossed a land bridge from Asia to North America around 13,500 years ago, fashioned stone weapons that slightly crumpled at the base rather than breaking at the tip when thrust into prey, say civil engineer Kaitlyn Thomas of Southern Methodist University in Dallas and colleagues. The Clovis...

    04/14/2017 - 15:15 Archaeology, Anthropology
  • News

    Food for microbes found on Enceladus

    Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus packs snacks suitable for microbial life.

    Data from the Cassini spacecraft show that the vaporous plume shooting out of the moon’s southern pole contains molecular hydrogen. It is probably generated when water in the moon’s subterranean ocean reacts with rock in its core, researchers report in the April 14 Science. Such reactions at hydrothermal vents and in...

    04/13/2017 - 14:00 Planetary Science, Astrobiology
  • News

    Rules restricting artificial trans fats are good for heart health

    Taking artificial trans fats off the menu reduces hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke, suggests a study that examined what happened after several areas in New York restricted the fats’ use. The findings portend larger scale public health benefits after a nationwide ban on artificial trans fats begins in the United States in 2018.

    Hospital admission rates for heart attacks...

    04/12/2017 - 16:48 Health, Science & Society