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E.g., 04/27/2017
E.g., 04/27/2017
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  • dolphin flinging an octopus
  • casts of Homo naledi’s brain
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Your search has returned 20266 articles:
  • Wild Things

    How a dolphin eats an octopus without dying

    Most people who eat octopus prefer it immobile, cut into pieces and nicely grilled or otherwise cooked. For some, though, the wiggly, sucker-covered arms of a live octopus are a treat — even though those arms can stick to the throat and suffocate the diner if they haven’t been chopped into small enough pieces.

    Dolphins risk the same fate when eating octopus — and they can’t cook it or...

    04/25/2017 - 13:00 Animals
  • News

    Homo naledi’s brain shows humanlike features

    NEW ORLEANS — A relatively small brain can pack a big evolutionary punch. Consider Homo naledi, a famously puzzling fossil species in the human genus. Despite having a brain only slightly larger than a chimpanzee’s, H. naledi displays key humanlike neural features, two anthropologists reported April 20 at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

    Those...

    04/25/2017 - 12:08 Human Evolution, Anthropology, Language
  • News

    Plot twist in methane mystery blames chemistry, not emissions, for recent rise

    A recent upsurge in planet-warming methane may not be caused by increasing emissions, as previously thought, but by methane lingering longer in the atmosphere.

    That’s the conclusion of two independent studies that indirectly tracked concentrations of hydroxyl, a highly reactive chemical that rips methane molecules apart. Hydroxyl levels in the atmosphere decreased roughly 7 or 8 percent...

    04/20/2017 - 08:00 Climate, Pollution, Chemistry
  • Editor's Note

    Scientists find amazement in what’s most familiar

    For her 7th birthday, my niece received a very special gift — a compound light microscope with a set of slides. As soon as we got it out of the package, she became a diligent young investigator, studying the leg of a fly, dog cardiac muscle and onion epidermal cells. But it wasn’t the prepared slides that captivated her most. She wanted to investigate more familiar things. We plucked hairs...

    04/19/2017 - 11:50 Particle Physics, Animals
  • Feature

    Venomous fish have evolved many ways to inflict pain

    Biologist Leo Smith held an unusual job while an undergraduate student in San Diego. Twice a year, he tagged along on a chartered boat with elderly passengers. The group needed him to identify two particular species of rockfish, the chilipepper rockfish and the California shortspine thornyhead. Once he’d found the red-orange creatures, the passengers would stab themselves in the arms with the...

    04/19/2017 - 11:30 Animals, Evolution
  • Science Ticker

    Frog slime protein fights off the flu

    The next flu drug could come from frog mucus. It’s not as crazy as it sounds: For decades, scientists have searched for new antiviral drugs by mining proteins that animals produce to protect themselves from microbes. In lab tests, proteins found in amphibian secretions can defend against HIV, herpes and now the flu.

    David Holthausen of Emory University and his colleagues sampled slime...

    04/19/2017 - 09:00 Biomedicine, Animals
  • Scicurious

    How the house mouse tamed itself

    Got a mouse in the house? Blame yourself. Not your housekeeping, but your species. Humans never intended to live a mouse-friendly life. But as we moved into a settled life, some animals — including a few unassuming mice — settled in, too. In the process, their species prospered — and took over the world.

    The rise and fall of the house mouse’s fortunes followed the stability and...

    04/19/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Animals
  • Wild Things

    Improbable ‘black swan’ events can devastate animal populations

    Sometimes, the improbable happens. The stock market crashes. A big earthquake shakes a city. A nuclear power plant has a meltdown. These seemingly unpredictable, rare incidents — dubbed black swan events — may be unlikely to happen on any specific day, but they do occur. And even though they may be rare, we take precautions. A smart investor balances their portfolio. A California homeowner...

    04/17/2017 - 09:00 Animals, Conservation
  • Science Ticker

    Size matters to lizards, but numbers may not

    The quantitative abilities of lizards may have their limits.

    From horses to salamanders, lots of different species display some form of number sense, but the phenomenon hasn’t been investigated in reptiles. So a team of researchers in Italy set up two experiments for 27 ruin lizards (Podarcis sicula) collected from walls on the University of Ferrara’s campus. In the first test, the team ...

    04/14/2017 - 16:00 Animals, Evolution
  • News

    Rules restricting artificial trans fats are good for heart health

    Taking artificial trans fats off the menu reduces hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke, suggests a study that examined what happened after several areas in New York restricted the fats’ use. The findings portend larger scale public health benefits after a nationwide ban on artificial trans fats begins in the United States in 2018.

    Hospital admission rates for heart attacks...

    04/12/2017 - 16:48 Health, Science & Society