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E.g., 06/21/2018
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  • Lara Diamond
  • little girl whispering in Santa's ear
  • illustration of classroom brain chairs
Your search has returned 804 articles:
  • Feature

    What consumer DNA data can and can’t tell you about your risk for certain diseases

    Results from Family Tree DNA, a genetic testing company, helped Lara Diamond find a branch of her family she thought had been lost in the Holocaust. Those 2012 results brought dozens of new people into her life.

    Eager to find more relatives, Diamond, now 42, a professional genealogist in Baltimore, decided to try out all the companies that offer geneaological DNA testing to see what else...

    06/03/2018 - 06:00 Genetics
  • Growth Curve

    The science behind kids’ belief in Santa

    Over the past week, my little girls have seen Santa in real life at least three times (though only one encounter was close enough to whisper “yo-yo” in his ear). You’d think that this Santa saturation might make them doubt that each one was the real deal. For one thing, they looked quite different. Brewery Santa’s beard was a joke, while Christmas-tree-lighting Santa’s beard was legit. Add to...

    12/22/2017 - 12:30 Child Development
  • Feature

    Teaching methods go from lab to classroom

    Sure, students in the classroom have to remember facts, but they also have to apply them. Some research efforts to enhance learning zero in on methods to strengthen memory and recall, while others bolster students’ abilities to stay on task, think more fluidly and mentally track and juggle information.

    But there’s a catch. The science behind student learning is so far based on carefully...

    09/05/2017 - 08:00 Psychology, Science & Society
  • Growth Curve

    Drugs for reflux disease in infants may come with unintended consequences

    When my girls were newborns, I spent a lot of time damp. Fluids were everywhere, some worse than others. One of the main contributors was milk, which, in various stages of digestion, came back to haunt me in a sloppy trail down my back.

    I was sometimes alarmed at the volume of fluid that came flying out of my tiny babies. And I remember asking our pediatrician if it was a problem. We...

    05/24/2017 - 07:00 Health, Child Development
  • Growth Curve

    Toddlers’ screen time linked to speech delays and lost sleep, but questions remain

    One of the most pressing and perplexing questions parents have to answer is what to do about screen time for little ones. Even scientists and doctors are stumped. That’s because no one knows how digital media such as smartphones, iPads and other screens affect children.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recently put out guidelines, but that advice was based on a frustratingly slim body of...

    05/12/2017 - 09:00 Child Development, Guidelines
  • News

    Epigenetic marks may help assess toxic exposure risk — someday

    Nearly everything people do, eat or come into contact with can change them in little ways — sometimes with big consequences. Exposure to some chemicals can damage DNA, leading to cancer and other problems. Other molecular changes—chemical tags added to DNA or to proteins called histones — may affect health without injuring DNA.

    There are more than 100 varieties of these chemical tags,...

    12/09/2016 - 06:00 Epigenetics, Toxicology
  • News

    Wanted: New ways to chill air conditioners, fridges

    The hunt is on for chemicals to keep both you and the planet cool.

    A new agreement will soon begin phasing out the powerful greenhouse gases currently used in air conditioners, refrigerators and insulating foams. These gases, called hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, can cause hundreds of times more global warming per molecule than carbon dioxide. The phaseout, announced by world leaders on...

    10/25/2016 - 09:00 Climate, Chemistry, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Reef rehab could help threatened corals make a comeback

    Coral reefs are bustling cities beneath tropical, sunlit waves. Thousands of colorful creatures click, dash and dart, as loud and fast-paced as citizens of any metropolis.

    Built up in tissue-thin layers over millennia, corals are the high-rise apartments of underwater Gotham. Calcium carbonate skeletons represent generations of tiny invertebrate animals, covered in a living layer of...

    10/18/2016 - 05:30 Oceans, Conservation
  • 50 years ago, noise was a nuisance (it still is)

    Noise Menace Threatens Man — Noise, forever bombarding urban and suburban man, is becoming an increasing menace to his psychological and physical well-being. Little cars with oversized engines, enormous trucks, sirens, construction projects and jet planes are exacting high prices in frazzled nerves, fatigue and poor hearing. — Science News, October 15, 1966 UPDATE

    Concerns about...

    10/09/2016 - 08:00 Health, Pollution
  • Wild Things

    Pup kidnapping has a happy ending when a seal gets two moms

    On December 3, 2000, at Cape Shirreff, near the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, a female Antarctic fur seal experienced a personal tragedy: She gave birth to a dead male pup. For the next day or so, the seal, numbered “12” by scientists watching her group, nuzzled her baby and vocalized to him.

    Nearby on December 4, another female, No. 29, gave birth to a live male pup. But soon she, too...

    07/29/2016 - 12:48 Animals, Oceans