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Your search has returned 27 images:
  • young child with parent
  • drawing of a female scientists
  • flu viruses
Your search has returned 1644 articles:
  • News

    Huge ‘word gap’ holding back low-income children may not exist after all

    A scientific takedown of a famous finding known as the 30-million-word gap may upend popular notions of how kids learn vocabulary.

    Research conducted more than 20 years ago concluded that by age 4, poor children hear an average of 30 million fewer words than their well-off peers. Since then, many researchers have accepted the reported word gap as a driver of later reading and writing...

    09/04/2018 - 05:30 Psychology, Language
  • The Science Life

    Kids are starting to picture scientists as women

    Ask a classroom of children to draw a scientist, and you’ll see plenty of Crayola-colored lab coats, goggles and bubbling beakers. That image hasn’t changed much since the 1960s. But the person wearing the lab coat is shifting.

    A new analysis finds that more female scientists have appeared in kids’ drawings in recent decades — going from nearly nonexistent in the 1960s to about a third...

    03/20/2018 - 11:27 Science & Society
  • News

    Scientists are tracking how the flu moves through a college campus

    COLLEGE PARK, Md. — Campus life typically challenges students with new opportunities for learning, discovery — and intimacy with germs. Lots of germs.

    That makes dormitories and their residents an ideal natural experiment to trace the germs’ paths. “You pack a bunch of college kids into a very small environment … we’re not known as being the cleanliest of people,” says sophomore Parker...

    02/07/2018 - 07:00 Biomedicine, Health
  • Growth Curve

    Staring into a baby’s eyes puts her brain waves and yours in sync

    When you lock eyes with a baby, it’s hard to look away. For one thing, babies are fun to look at. They’re so tiny and cute and interesting. For another, babies love to stare back. I remember my babies staring at me so hard, with their eyebrows raised and unblinking eyes wide open. They would have killed in a staring contest.

    This mutual adoration of staring may be for a good reason. When...

    12/05/2017 - 15:30 Child Development, Parenting
  • Growth Curve

    Moms tweak the timbre of their voice when talking to their babies

    Voices carry so much information. Joy and anger, desires, comfort, vocabulary lessons. As babies learn about their world, the voice of their mother is a particularly powerful tool. One way mothers wield that tool is by speaking in the often ridiculous, occasionally condescending baby talk.

    Also called “motherese,” this is a high-pitched, exaggerated language full of short, slow phrases...

    10/18/2017 - 07:00 Parenting, Child Development
  • Editor's Note

    Learning is a ubiquitous, mysterious phenomenon

    I’ll admit it. I’m addicted to learning. There’s nothing quite like the thrill that comes with finding out something new.

    It’s no surprise I ended up this way. My parents were public school teachers. They instilled in me the belief that education not only opens up new opportunities but also is enjoyable in itself. My parents regularly took my siblings and me to museums, encouraged...

    09/06/2017 - 13:15 Science & Society, Neuroscience
  • September 16, 2017

    09/06/2017 - 13:14
  • Feature

    Teaching methods go from lab to classroom

    Sure, students in the classroom have to remember facts, but they also have to apply them. Some research efforts to enhance learning zero in on methods to strengthen memory and recall, while others bolster students’ abilities to stay on task, think more fluidly and mentally track and juggle information.

    But there’s a catch. The science behind student learning is so far based on carefully...

    09/05/2017 - 08:00 Psychology, Science & Society
  • Scicurious

    Scientists may work to prevent bias, but they don’t always say so

    For a scientist, conducting a scientific study is walking into a minefield of potential biases that could detonate all over the results. Are the mice in the study randomly distributed among treatment groups? Does the person evaluating an animal’s behavior know what treatment the mouse got — and thus have an expectation for the outcome? Are there enough subjects in each group to reduce the odds...

    02/28/2017 - 15:53 Science & Society
  • Growth Curve

    A preschooler’s bubbly personality may rub off on friends

    A preschool classroom is an ecosystem unlike any other. Scents of glue and snack time waft through the air. Bright, clunky art papers the walls. Fun-sized furniture makes visiting adults feel like awkward giants. In the name of science, a team of psychologists spent an entire year inside two such rooms, meticulously documenting changes in preschoolers’ personalities.

    By the end of the...

    02/23/2017 - 08:00 Child Development, Health