Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 11/18/2017
E.g., 11/18/2017
Your search has returned 23 images:
  • mom talking to baby
  • western Antarctic Peninsula
  • illustration of classroom brain chairs
Your search has returned 1640 articles:
  • Growth Curve

    Moms tweak the timbre of their voice when talking to their babies

    Voices carry so much information. Joy and anger, desires, comfort, vocabulary lessons. As babies learn about their world, the voice of their mother is a particularly powerful tool. One way mothers wield that tool is by speaking in the often ridiculous, occasionally condescending baby talk.

    Also called “motherese,” this is a high-pitched, exaggerated language full of short, slow phrases...

    10/18/2017 - 07:00 Parenting, Child Development
  • Editor's Note

    Learning is a ubiquitous, mysterious phenomenon

    I’ll admit it. I’m addicted to learning. There’s nothing quite like the thrill that comes with finding out something new.

    It’s no surprise I ended up this way. My parents were public school teachers. They instilled in me the belief that education not only opens up new opportunities but also is enjoyable in itself. My parents regularly took my siblings and me to museums, encouraged us to...

    09/06/2017 - 13:15 Science & Society, Neuroscience
  • September 16, 2017

    09/06/2017 - 13:14
  • Feature

    Teaching methods go from lab to classroom

    Sure, students in the classroom have to remember facts, but they also have to apply them. Some research efforts to enhance learning zero in on methods to strengthen memory and recall, while others bolster students’ abilities to stay on task, think more fluidly and mentally track and juggle information.

    But there’s a catch. The science behind student learning is so far based on carefully...

    09/05/2017 - 08:00 Psychology, Science & Society
  • Scicurious

    Scientists may work to prevent bias, but they don’t always say so

    For a scientist, conducting a scientific study is walking into a minefield of potential biases that could detonate all over the results. Are the mice in the study randomly distributed among treatment groups? Does the person evaluating an animal’s behavior know what treatment the mouse got — and thus have an expectation for the outcome? Are there enough subjects in each group to reduce the odds...

    02/28/2017 - 15:53 Science & Society
  • Growth Curve

    A preschooler’s bubbly personality may rub off on friends

    A preschool classroom is an ecosystem unlike any other. Scents of glue and snack time waft through the air. Bright, clunky art papers the walls. Fun-sized furniture makes visiting adults feel like awkward giants. In the name of science, a team of psychologists spent an entire year inside two such rooms, meticulously documenting changes in preschoolers’ personalities.

    By the end of the...

    02/23/2017 - 08:00 Child Development, Health
  • Permission to Republish

    Society for Science & the Public, publisher of Science News and Science News for Students (formerly Science News for Kids), grants non-exclusive, one-time rights to reproduce content to third parties for editorial, commercial and educational purposes. Publishers, media organizations, for-profit and non-profit organizations (including schools, educators and government agencies) may acquire...
    01/30/2017 - 15:54
  • News

    Early exposure to signing helps deaf kids on mental task

    WASHINGTON — Deaf children who learn to sign early may boost their brainpower in ways unrelated to language.

    “Most deaf children are born to hearing families, and most hearing parents do not sign with their newborn deaf children,” clinical neuropsychologist Peter Hauser, who is deaf, explained February 12 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “...

    02/13/2016 - 13:21 Neuroscience, Biomedicine, Health
  • Reviews & Previews

    Three kids’ science books offer fun, fascinating experiments

    Summer has flown by. As the school year begins, three recently published books can pique kids’ curiosity about science and get them experimenting. The books, newly out in paperback or revised edition, offer a wealth of ideas for budding naturalists, physicists or chemists.

    Many at-home, do-it-yourself physics books boast that their experiments can be done with household items, but then...

    08/14/2015 - 06:00 Chemistry, Physics, Ecology
  • Feature

    The tree of life gets a makeover

    The tree of life might seem like a stable design, appropriate for indelible ink. Plenty of people think so. An Internet search for “phylogenetic tattoos” turns up some showy skin art.

    But the branches are shifting. Since a radial diagram based on 1990s genetics inspired a rush for tree-of-life tattoos, technical diagrams of life’s ancestral connections have been redrawn. And the...

    07/29/2015 - 15:00 Evolution, Microbes, Genetics