Search Content | Science News

Be a Champion for Science

Get your subscription to

Science News when you join.

Search Content

E.g., 04/25/2017
E.g., 04/25/2017
Your search has returned 5019 images:
  • dolphin flinging an octopus
  • lambs
  • casts of Homo naledi’s brain
Your search has returned 109040 articles:
  • Wild Things

    How a dolphin eats an octopus without dying

    Most people who eat octopus prefer it immobile, cut into pieces and nicely grilled or otherwise cooked. For some, though, the wiggly, sucker-covered arms of a live octopus are a treat — even though those arms can stick to the throat and suffocate the diner if they haven’t been chopped into small enough pieces.

    Dolphins risk the same fate when eating octopus — and they can’t cook it or...

    04/25/2017 - 13:00 Animals
  • News

    Faux womb keeps preemie lambs alive

    Premature babies may one day continue developing in an artificial womb, new work with sheep suggests.

    A fluid-filled bag that mimics the womb kept premature lambs alive and developing normally for four weeks, researchers report April 25 in Nature Communications. Lambs at a gestational age equivalent to that of a 23- or 24-week-old human fetus had normal lung and brain development after a...

    04/25/2017 - 12:30 Biomedicine
  • News

    Homo naledi’s brain shows humanlike features

    NEW ORLEANS — A relatively small brain can pack a big evolutionary punch. Consider Homo naledi, a famously puzzling fossil species in the human genus. Despite having a brain only slightly larger than a chimpanzee’s, H. naledi displays key humanlike neural features, two anthropologists reported April 20 at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

    Those...

    04/25/2017 - 12:08 Human Evolution, Anthropology, Language
  • The –est

    Oldest evidence of patterned silk loom found in China

    An ancient tomb in southern China has provided the oldest known examples, in scaled-down form, of revolutionary weaving machines called pattern looms. Four immobile models of pattern looms illuminate how weavers first produced silk textiles with repeating patterns. The cloths were traded across Eurasia via the Silk Road, Chinese archaeologists report in the April Antiquity. The models, created...

    04/25/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology
  • Rethink

    Beetles have been mooching off insect colonies for millions of years

    Mooching roommates are an ancient problem. Certain species of beetles evolved to live with and leech off social insects such as ants and termites as long ago as the mid-Cretaceous, two new beetle fossils suggest. The finds date the behavior, called social parasitism, to almost 50 million years earlier than previously thought.

    Ants and termites are eusocial — they live in communal groups...

    04/24/2017 - 16:00 Animals, Paleontology
  • News

    No long, twisted tail trails the solar system

    The solar system doesn’t have a long, twisted tail after all.

    Data from the Cassini and Voyager spacecraft show that the bubble of particles surrounding the solar system is spherical, not comet-shaped. Observing a spherical bubble runs counter to 55 years of speculation on the shape of this solar system feature, says Tom Krimigis of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel...

    04/24/2017 - 11:00 Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    Gamma-ray evidence for dark matter weakens

    A potential sign of dark matter is looking less convincing in the wake of a new analysis.

    High-energy blips of radiation known as gamma rays seem to be streaming from the center of the Milky Way in excess. Some scientists have proposed that dark matter could be the cause of that overabundance. Particles of dark matter — an invisible and unidentified substance that makes up the bulk of...

    04/24/2017 - 09:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • Science & the Public

    We went to the March for Science in D.C. Here's what happened

    */ [View the story "The March for Science, Washington, D.C." on Storify]
    04/22/2017 - 19:02 Science & Society
  • Science Ticker

    Watch the March for Science in Washington, D.C.

    Science News will be on the scene at the April 22 March for Science in Washington, D.C.  Follow us on Twitter (@ScienceNews) and watch the live stream below.  

    The march may be “unprecedented,” sociologist Kelly Moore told Rachel Ehrenberg for a blog post giving a historical perspective on scientists' activism. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to...

    04/22/2017 - 06:00 Science & Society
  • News in Brief

    Ötzi the Iceman froze to death

    NEW ORLEANS — Ever since Ötzi’s mummified body was found in the Italian Alps in 1991, researchers have been trying to pin down how the 5,300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman died. It now looks like this Copper Age hunter-gatherer simply froze to death, perhaps after suffering minor blood loss from an arrow wound to his left shoulder, anthropologist Frank Rühli of the University of Zurich reported...

    04/21/2017 - 17:47 Anthropology