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E.g., 07/28/2017
E.g., 07/28/2017
Your search has returned 5267 images:
  • illustration of exomoons
  • Ramazzottius varieornatus
  • microscope image of copper
Your search has returned 109301 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Astronomers may have found an exomoon, and Hubble is going to check

    The first evidence for an exomoon — a moon orbiting a planet orbiting a distant star — may have been spotted in data from the Kepler space telescope. But surprisingly, exomoons in general may be rare, at least around planets close to their stars.

    Alex Teachey and David Kipping of Columbia University analyzed the dips in light from exoplanets passing, or transiting, in front of their...

    07/28/2017 - 06:00 Astronomy, Exoplanets, Astrobiology
  • News

    Tardigrades aren’t champion gene swappers after all

    A peek at tardigrades' genetic diaries may dispel a rumor about an amazing feat the tiny creatures were supposed to perform: borrowing large numbers of genes from other organisms.

    Tardigrades — also known as water bears and moss piglets — hardly ever borrow DNA from other creatures, researchers report July 27 in PLOS Biology.

    New analyses of DNA from two species of water bear,...

    07/27/2017 - 14:06 Genetics, Animals, Evolution
  • News

    The thinnest films of copper look flat, but they aren’t

    Like the surface of an alien planet, thin sheets of copper display a complex topography of ridges and valleys. These never-before-seen undulations may spell trouble for electronic gadgets: The zigzagging surface could contribute to the electrical resistance of miniature copper wires that snake throughout computer chips.

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope, scientists observed nanoscale...

    07/27/2017 - 14:00 Materials
  • Science Ticker

    Slug slime inspires a new type of surgical glue

    View video

    For a glue that holds up inside the body, turn to the humble slug, Arion subfuscus. A new super-sticky material mimics slug slime’s ability to stick on slick wet surfaces and could lead to more effective medical adhesives.

    The material has two parts: a sticky layer that attaches to a surface, and a shock-absorbing layer that reduces strain. That makes the adhesive less...

    07/27/2017 - 14:00 Materials, Biomedicine, Animals
  • News

    Ancient DNA offers clues to the Canaanites’ fate

    DNA is setting the record straight on ancient Canaanites.

    For the first time, scientists have deciphered the complete genetic instruction manuals of Canaanites. By comparing five Canaanite genomes with those of other ancient and modern populations, the researchers identified the Canaanites’ ancestors and discovered their descendants, modern Lebanese people.

    The results, reported...

    07/27/2017 - 12:31 Anthropology, Ancestry, Genetics
  • 50 Years Ago

    50 years ago, diabetic mice offered hope for understanding human disease

    Hope from diabetic mice

    [Millions of diabetics] could be indebted to a strain of diabetic mice being bred in Bar Harbor, Maine. In diabetes research, “this mouse is the best working model to date,” one of its discoverers, Dr. Katharine P. Hummel, says.… A satisfactory animal subject had eluded diabetes researchers, until the mouse was found. — Science News, August 12, 1967

    Update

    ...

    07/27/2017 - 07:00 Genetics
  • News

    Half of the Milky Way comes from other galaxies

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    Galaxies may grow by swiping gas from their neighbors.

    New simulations suggest that nearly half the matter in the Milky Way may have been siphoned from the gas of other galaxies. That gas provides the raw material that galaxies use to build their bulk. The finding, scheduled to appear in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, reveals a new, unexpected...

    07/26/2017 - 21:00 Astronomy
  • Your Free Audiobook - Life Hacks

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    It’s time to get up-close and personal with the creatures that live in our world—from mosquitoes to geckos to dolphins, and even our fellow humans. The stories that follow from Science News for Students explore the bodies, minds and behaviors of an impressive range of organisms, and turn up some true surprises.

    Listen and learn:

    How birds stay in the airHow mucus keeps you...
    07/26/2017 - 16:39
  • News

    Borrowed genes give mums the blues

    Mums are now a flower of a different color. Japanese researchers have added a hint of clear sky to the humble plant’s palette, genetically engineering the first-ever “true blue” chrysanthemum.

    “Obtaining blue-colored flowers is the Holy Grail for plant breeders,” says Mark Bridgen, a plant breeder at Cornell University. The results are “very exciting.”

    Compounds called delphinidin-...

    07/26/2017 - 15:45 Plants, Genetics, Chemistry
  • The Science Life

    Balloons will broadcast the 2017 solar eclipse live from on high

    Only a lucky few have watched a solar eclipse from above the Earth. Angela Des Jardins wants to bring that view to everyone.

    On August 21, Des Jardins, an astrophysicist at Montana State University in Bozeman, will help broadcast the first livestream of a total solar eclipse from the edge of space. She and more than 50 groups across the United States will launch high-altitude balloons to...

    07/26/2017 - 13:30 Astronomy, Networks, Science & Society