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E.g., 04/20/2018
E.g., 04/20/2018
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  • field experiment of CO2 levels
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Your search has returned 110112 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Larger spleens may help ‘sea nomads’ stay underwater longer

    In turquoise waters off the Indonesian coast, evolutionary geneticist Melissa Ilardo watched as the diver, wearing handmade, wooden goggles, spotted a giant clam meters below and darted down to retrieve it.

    The diver was one of the Bajau people of Southeast Asia, known for holding their breath for long periods while spearing fish and gathering other seafood. During a typical day, these “...

    04/19/2018 - 15:04 Physiology, Genetics
  • News

    Rising CO2 levels might not be as good for plants as we thought

    Two major groups of plants have shown a surprising reversal of fortunes in the face of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

    During a 20-year field experiment in Minnesota, a widespread group of plants that initially grew faster when fed more CO2  stopped doing so after 12 years, researchers report in the April 20 Science. Meanwhile, the extra CO2 began to stimulate the...

    04/19/2018 - 14:00 Climate, Plants, Ecosystems
  • News in Brief

    Male fruit flies enjoy ejaculation

    Moody red lighting in a lab is helping researchers figure out what fruit flies like best about sex.

    The question has arisen as scientists try to tease out the neurobiological steps in how the brain’s natural reward system can get hijacked in alcoholism, says neuroscientist Galit Shohat-Ophir of Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel.

    Male fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster)...

    04/19/2018 - 12:00 Animals, Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    A hole in an ancient cow’s skull could have been surgery practice

    Ancient surgeons may have practiced dangerous skull-opening procedures on cows before operating on people.

    A previously excavated cow skull from a roughly 5,400- to 5,000-year-old settlement in France contains a surgically created hole on the right side, a new study finds. No signs of bone healing, which start several days after an injury, appear around the opening. One or more people...

    04/19/2018 - 09:00 Anthropology
  • Science Ticker

    This plastic-gobbling enzyme just got an upgrade

    Just a few tweaks to a bacterial enzyme make it a lean, mean plastic-destroying machine.

    One type of plastic, polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, is widely used in polyester clothing and disposable bottles and is notoriously persistent in landfills. In 2016, Japanese scientists identified a new species of bacteria, Ideonella sakaiensis, which has a specialized enzyme that can naturally...

    04/19/2018 - 07:00 Microbes, Pollution
  • Science Ticker

    NASA’s TESS spacecraft launches to begin its exoplanet search

    After a two-day delay, the planet-hunting TESS telescope successfully launched into a clear blue sky at Cape Canaveral, Fla., at 6:51 p.m. EDT on April 18.

    TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is headed to an orbit between the Earth and the moon, a journey that will take about two months. In its first two years, the telescope will seek planets orbiting 200,000 nearby, bright...

    04/18/2018 - 19:36 Exoplanets
  • Mystery Solved

    How ravens caused a LIGO data glitch

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — 

    While the data was amassing, suddenly there came a tapping,As of something gently rapping, rapping at LIGO’s door.

    The source of a mysterious glitch in data from a gravitational wave detector has been unmasked: rap-tap-tapping ravens with a thirst for shaved ice. At the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO...

    04/18/2018 - 15:00 Physics
  • News

    This meteorite’s diamonds hint that it was born in a lost planet

    A chunk of space rock may have been forged inside a long-lost planet from the early solar system. Tiny pockets of iron and sulfur embedded in diamonds inside the meteorite probably formed under high pressures found only inside planets the size of Mercury or Mars, researchers suggest April 17 in Nature Communications.

    The parent planet no longer exists, though — it was smashed to...

    04/18/2018 - 14:30 Planetary Science
  • News

    Why touch can be such a creepy sensation in VR

    There’s a fine line between immersive and unnerving when it comes to touch sensation in virtual reality.

    More realistic tactile feedback in VR can ruin a user’s feeling of immersion, researchers report online April 18 in Science Robotics. The finding suggests that the “uncanny valley” — a term that describes how humanoid robots that look almost but not quite human are creepier than their...

    04/18/2018 - 14:00 Technology
  • News

    Masses of shrimp and krill may play a huge role in mixing oceans

    When it comes to tiny ocean swimmers, the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts. Ocean turbulence stirred up by multitudes of creatures such as krill can be powerful enough to extend hundreds of meters down into the deep, a new study suggests.

    Brine shrimp moving vertically in two different laboratory tanks created small eddies that aggregated into a jet roughly the size of the...

    04/18/2018 - 13:20 Oceans, Ecology