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Your search has returned 290 articles:
  • Feature

    Conflict reigns over the history and origins of money

    Wherever you go, money talks. And it has for a long time.

    Sadly, though, money has been mum about its origins. For such a central element of our lives, money’s ancient roots and the reasons for its invention are unclear.

    As cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin multiply into a flock of digital apparitions, researchers are still battling over how and where money came to be. And some draw...

    07/29/2018 - 08:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
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    ...

    05/25/2018 - 15:58
  • Feature

    Meet the speedsters of the plant world

    Somewhere in the wetlands of South Carolina, a buzzing fly alights on a rosy-pink surface. As the fly explores the strange scenery, it unknowingly brushes a small hair sticking up like a slender sword. Strolling along, the fly accidentally grazes another hair. Suddenly, the pink surface closes in from both sides, snapping shut like a pair of ravenous jaws. The blur of movement lasts only a...

    05/16/2018 - 12:11 Plants, Biophysics, Physics
  • Feature

    New fossils are redefining what makes a dinosaur

    “There’s a very faint dimple here,” Sterling Nesbitt says, holding up a palm-sized fossil to the light. The fossil, a pelvic bone, belonged to a creature called Teleocrater rhadinus. The slender, 2-meter-long reptile ran on all fours and lived 245 million years ago, about 10 million to 15 million years before scientists think dinosaurs first appeared.

    Nesbitt, a paleontologist at...

    02/21/2018 - 16:00 Paleontology, Evolution
  • Scicurious

    On social media, privacy is no longer a personal choice

    Some people might think that online privacy is a, well, private matter. If you don’t want your information getting out online, don’t put it on social media. Simple, right?

    But keeping your information private isn’t just about your own choices. It’s about your friends’ choices, too. Results from a study of a now-defunct social media site show that the inhabitants of the digital age may...

    08/24/2017 - 15:30 Science & Society
  • News

    Why is this year’s solar eclipse such a big deal for scientists?

    The sky will go dark. The temperature will drop. Stars will shine in the middle of the day. For the first time in nearly a century, millions of Americans from coast-to-coast will witness a total solar eclipse. Those who have watched the sun suddenly snuff out say it’s an otherworldly feeling. It can be humbling. It can be spiritual. It can change the course of history (SN: 5/13/17, p. 29...

    08/11/2017 - 07:00 Astronomy, Earth, Physics, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Can DNA predict a face?

    Florida police are searching for a man who lurks in the shadows.

    For more than two years, he has terrorized at least a dozen women, peeping into windows and slipping into bedrooms to watch them sleep. He has touched several women’s feet or hair — some, he has sexually assaulted.

    The media dubbed him the “Serial Creeper,” and police are desperate to find him. In September, they...

    12/01/2015 - 11:29 Genetics, Science & Society
  • Feature

    The human genome takes shape and shifts over time

    If you could unravel all the DNA in a single human cell and stretch it out, you’d have a molecular ribbon about 2 meters long and 2 nanometers across. Now imagine packing it all back into the cell’s nucleus, a container only 5 to 10 micrometers wide. That would be like taking a telephone cord that runs from Manhattan to San Francisco and cramming it into a two-story suburban house.

    ...

    08/24/2015 - 12:41 Genetics, Microbiology
  • Science Visualized

    How to reconstruct the face of an extinct human ancestor

    View the slideshow

    Cícero Moraes is adding new portraits to the human family album. The 3-D designer based in Sinop, Brazil, has digitally reconstructed the faces of over 15 extinct hominid species, including Paranthropus boisei, a distant cousin to modern humans. The faces are on display at the University of Padua in Italy (see "The expressive face of human history on display.")

    ...
    03/24/2015 - 11:00 Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • Wild Things

    Little thylacine had a big bite

    In the northeast corner of Queensland lies one of Australia’s great treasures — the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, home to more than 250 sites that are rich in fossils. In that region, some 24 to 11.6 million years ago, as many as five relatives of the extinct Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, roamed forests along with giant carnivorous rat-kangaroos, marsupial lions, the world’s oldest known...

    04/20/2014 - 14:00 Animals, Paleontology