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E.g., 12/08/2016
E.g., 12/08/2016
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  • buruli ulcer
  • Manogea spider
  • illustration of newly officially named stars
Your search has returned 3706 articles:
  • News

    Losing tropical forest might raise risks of human skin ulcers, deformed bones

    Clearing tropical forests may raise the risk of people being exposed to a gruesome disease called Buruli ulcer, a new study suggests.

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the bacteria that cause Buruli skin lesions and bone deformities, can thrive in a wide range of wild creatures, especially tiny insects grazing on freshwater algae, says Aaron Morris, now at Imperial College London. Surveying more...

    12/07/2016 - 14:00 Ecology, Biomedicine, Conservation
  • News

    First spider superdads discovered

    The first normally solitary spider to win Dad of the Year sets up housekeeping in a web above his offspring and often ends up as their sole defender and single parent.

    Moms handle most parental care known in spiders, says Rafael Rios Moura at the Federal University of Uberlândia in Brazil. But either or both parents care for egg sacs and spiderlings in the small Manogea porracea species...

    12/05/2016 - 09:00 Animals, Evolution
  • The Name Game

    Gaggle of stars get official names

    For centuries, stargazers have known which star was Polaris and which was Sirius, but those designations were by unofficial tradition. The International Astronomical Union, arbiter of naming things in space, has now blessed the monikers of 227 stars in our galaxy. As of November 24, names such as Polaris (the North Star) and Betelgeuse (the bright red star in Orion) are approved.

    Until...

    12/02/2016 - 13:47 Astronomy
  • News

    Public, doctors alike confused about food allergies

    Our grasp of food allergy science is as jumbled as a can of mixed nuts. While there are tantalizing clues on how food allergies emerge and might be prevented, misconceptions are plentiful and broad conclusions are lacking, concludes a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

    As a result, both the general public and medical community are confused and ill...

    11/30/2016 - 17:19 Immune Science, Science & Society
  • News

    Mitochondria variants battle for cell supremacy

    Some mitochondria naturally have an advantage over others in the battle for cellular domination, a new study shows. The finding could make procedures for producing “three-parent babies” safer.

    Doctors carrying out DNA-swapping techniques to prevent mothers from passing mitochondrial diseases to their children should choose egg donors whose mitochondria can hold their own against other...

    11/30/2016 - 13:00 Cells, Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Animals give clues to the origins of human number crunching

    When Christian Agrillo runs number-related experiments in his lab, he wishes his undergraduate subjects good luck. For certain tests, that’s about all he says. Giving instructions to the people would be unfair to the fish.

    Agrillo, of the University of Padua in Italy, is finishing up several years of pitting humans against fish in trials of their abilities to compare quantities. He can’t...

    11/29/2016 - 14:00 Animals, Evolution, Neuroscience, Numbers
  • Science Ticker

    Coral die-off in Great Barrier Reef reaches record levels

    Tourists planning a visit to northern portions of the Great Barrier Reef should be prepared for some sad sights. On average, two-thirds of the nearshore coral in the mostly pristine area north of Port Douglas, Australia, has been pronounced dead by scientists who have surveyed the reef. It’s the largest coral die-off ever recorded in Great Barrier Reef history, researchers from the ARC Center...

    11/29/2016 - 09:43 Oceans, Climate, Animals
  • News

    Oldest alphabet identified as Hebrew

    SAN ANTONIO — The world’s earliest alphabet, inscribed on stone slabs at several Egyptian sites, was an early form of Hebrew, a controversial new analysis concludes.

    Israelites living in Egypt transformed that civilization’s hieroglyphics into Hebrew 1.0 more than 3,800 years ago, at a time when the Old Testament describes Jews living in Egypt, says archaeologist and epigrapher Douglas...

    11/19/2016 - 08:00 Language, Archaeology
  • It's Alive

    An echidna’s to-do list: Sleep. Eat. Dig up Australia.

    With no nipples and reptilelike eggs, short-beaked echidnas look like a first draft of a mammal. Yet, as Australia’s other digging mammals decline from invasive predators, the well-defended echidna is getting new love as an ecosystem engineer.

    The only mammals today that lay eggs are the four echidna species and the duck-billed platypus. Eggs are probably a holdover from the time before...

    11/18/2016 - 12:00 Animals, Ecology
  • News

    Tweaking how plants manage a crisis boosts photosynthesis

    Enhancing just three genes helps plants harvest more light, raising new hopes for developing crops that can keep up with food demands from a crowded planet.

    Genetically engineered tobacco plants, chosen to test the concept, managed the unusual feat of growing 14 to 20 percent more mass — meaning more crop yield — than untweaked plants, says Krishna Niyogi of the University of California...

    11/17/2016 - 14:45 Plants, Agriculture, Genetics