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  • November 24, 2018

    11/26/2018 - 08:14
  • Reviews & Previews

    Why a chemistry teacher started a science board game company

    A physicist, a gamer and two editors walk into a bar. No, this isn’t the setup for some joke. After work one night, a few Science News staffers tried out a new board game, Subatomic. This deck-building game combines chemistry and particle physics for an enjoyable — and educational — time.

    Subatomic is simple to grasp: Players use quark and photon cards to build protons, neutrons and...

    11/25/2018 - 09:00 Particle Physics, Chemistry, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Engineers are plugging holes in drinking water treatment

    Off a gravel road at the edge of a college campus — next door to the town’s holding pen for stray dogs — is a busy test site for the newest technologies in drinking water treatment.

    In the large shed-turned-laboratory, University of Massachusetts Amherst engineer David Reckhow has started a movement. More people want to use his lab to test new water treatment technologies than the...

    11/25/2018 - 06:00 Pollution, Health
  • 50 years ago, screwworm flies inspired a new approach to insect control

    Screwworm fly upsurge 

    Screwworms, the first pest to be eliminated on a large scale by the use of the sterile male technique, have shown an alarming increase, according to U.S. and Mexican officials…. The screwworm fly lays its eggs in open wounds on cattle. The maggots live on the flesh of their host, causing damage and death, and economic losses of many millions of dollars. —...

    11/23/2018 - 07:00 Agriculture, Ecology, History of Science
  • Editor's Note

    Do you know how your drinking water is treated?

    Disinfection of public drinking water is one of the great public health success stories of the 20th century. In 1900, outbreaks of cholera and typhoid, both caused by waterborne bacteria, were common in American cities. In 1908, Jersey City, N.J., became the first U.S. city to routinely disinfect community water. Other cities and towns quickly followed, and by 1920, the typhoid rate...
    11/21/2018 - 07:15 Science & Society, Health, History of Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers react to the SN 10 and Jocelyn Bell Burnell

    Point, counterpoint

    In “The SN 10: These scientists defy limits to tackle big problems” (SN: 10/13/18, p. 18), Science News profiled 10 early- and mid-career scientists who are pushing boundaries to answer pressing questions facing science and society.

    Some readers had strong reactions to the profiles.

    Charles Eby praised stories about the SN 10 scientists. “Of course I love to...

    11/21/2018 - 07:00 Science & Society, Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • Special Gift with your Science News subscription

    Special Gift with your Science News subscription

    FREE with your paid subscription — our terrific Science Visualized special edition! Subscribe today to receive your copy of this amazing collection of science stories that's a feast for the eyes.

    Science News is a nonprofit. You can support our unique journalism by subscribing today.

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    11/16/2018 - 22:14
  • News in Brief

    A Bronze Age game called 58 holes was found chiseled into stone in Azerbaijan

    DENVER — A dotted pattern pecked into stone at a remote Eurasian rock-shelter represents a Bronze Age game that was thought to have existed at that time only in Mesopotamia, Egypt and other Near Eastern regions.

    The game is known as 58 holes, or Hounds and Jackals. Archaeologist Walter Crist of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City described his surprising discovery of...

    11/16/2018 - 13:12 Archaeology, Anthropology
  • News

    It’s official: We’re redefining the kilogram

    Out with the old — kilogram, that is.

    Scientists will soon ditch a specialized hunk of metal that defines the mass of a kilogram. Oddly enough, every measurement of mass made anywhere on Earth is tied back to this one cylindrical object. Known as “Le Grand K,” the cylinder, cast in 1879, is kept carefully sequestered in a secure, controlled environment outside Paris.

    On November 16...

    11/16/2018 - 07:22 Numbers, Physics
  • News

    A massive crater hides beneath Greenland’s ice

    There’s something big lurking beneath Greenland’s ice. Using airborne ice-penetrating radar, scientists have discovered a 31-kilometer-wide crater — larger than the city of Paris — buried under as much as 930 meters of ice in northwest Greenland.

    The meteorite that slammed into Earth and formed the pit would have been about 1.5 kilometers across, researchers say. That’s large enough to...

    11/14/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Climate