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  • News

    Living Long on Less? Mouse and human cells respond to slim diets

    Scientists have known since the 1930s that mice and other animals live 30 to 50 percent longer when placed on a diet that's low in calories yet nutritionally complete. The unanswered question has been whether calorie restriction has the same life-extending effect on people.Direct proof of a payoff for human longevity would take decades. But scientists have now shown that people on a calorie-...
    03/07/2007 - 10:49 Other
  • Food for Thought

    Salmon Safety

    Two recent reports urge more fish consumption, including farmed salmon. But previous studies had warned against farmed salmon because of high levels of organic pollutants. So, do we eat it or don't we?A report published in Science 3 years ago warned that some kinds of salmon should be eaten at most once every 5 months. But in October 2006, an article in the Journal of the American...
    01/15/2007 - 23:14 Nutrition
  • Feature

    Science News Challenge

    Every word required for this puzzle appeared in a Science News article during 2004.If you need a hint, check the print article by going to the volume and page number listed after each clue or find the online version of the article by clicking on the link. An asterisk indicates that the article is available free to all visitors to Science News Online. Subscribers who have...
    12/15/2004 - 16:05 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Science News Challenge

    Every word required for this puzzle appeared in a Science News article during 2003.If you need a hint, check the print article by going to the volume and page number listed after each clue or find the online version of the article by clicking on the link. An asterisk indicates that the article is available free to all visitors to Science News Online. Subscribers who have...
    12/17/2003 - 12:47 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Science News Challenge

    Every word required for this puzzle appeared in a Science News article during 2003.If you need a hint, check the print article by going to the volume and page number listed after each clue or find the online version of the article by clicking on the link. An asterisk indicates that the article is available free to all visitors to Science News Online. Subscribers who have...
    12/17/2003 - 12:47 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2003

    Fighting off the virusesA couple of decades ago, if someone had asked whether you'd heard about "that new virus," you'd have know that they were concerned about a health threat. This year, you'd have needed to ask, "Medical or computer?" On both viral fronts, 2003 was eventful. A new viral disease emerged in China, and travelers spread it around the globe. A series of novel viruses and other...
    12/16/2003 - 12:27 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2003

    Fighting off the virusesA couple of decades ago, if someone had asked whether you'd heard about "that new virus," you'd have know that they were concerned about a health threat. This year, you'd have needed to ask, "Medical or computer?" On both viral fronts, 2003 was eventful. A new viral disease emerged in China, and travelers spread it around the globe. A series of novel viruses and other...
    12/16/2003 - 12:27 Humans & Society
  • News

    Hold the Phone? Radiation from cell phones hurts rats' brains

    A single 2-hour exposure to the microwaves emitted by some cell phones kills brain cells in rats, a group of Swedish researchers claims. If confirmed, the results would be the first to directly link cell-phone radiation to brain damage in any animal.No such evidence exists for people. But with cell-phone use skyrocketing, some scientists recommend precautionary measures–for example, avoiding...
    02/19/2003 - 16:40 Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2002

    A year of twists and turnsWhat the world needs, say some people, is more one-handed scientists. That way, reports would have fewer sentences starting, "On the other hand. . . ."Actually, scientists need all the hands they can muster. Most of the phenomena they investigate are so complex that even carefully designed experiments can't take into account all possible influences on the results....
    12/17/2002 - 10:06
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2002

    A year of twists and turnsWhat the world needs, say some people, is more one-handed scientists. That way, reports would have fewer sentences starting, "On the other hand. . . ."Actually, scientists need all the hands they can muster. Most of the phenomena they investigate are so complex that even carefully designed experiments can't take into account all possible influences on the results....
    12/17/2002 - 10:06