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E.g., 02/21/2017
Your search has returned 196 images:
  • talking to a smartphone
  • Germanium
  • supernova simulation
Your search has returned 83396 articles:
  • 50 Years Ago

    Speech recognition has come a long way in 50 years

    Computers that hear

    Computer engineers have dreamed of a machine that would translate speech into something that a vacuum tube or transistor could understand. Now at last, some promising hardware is being developed.... It is still a long way from the kind of science fiction computer that can understand sentences or long speeches. — Science News, March 4, 1967

    Update 

    That 1967...

    02/16/2017 - 12:30 Computing, Technology
  • 50 Years Ago

    Germanium computer chips gain ground on silicon — again

    First germanium integrated circuits

    Integrated circuits made of germanium instead of silicon have been reported … by researchers at International Business Machines Corp. Even though the experimental devices are about three times as large as the smallest silicon circuits, they reportedly offer faster overall switching speed. Germanium … has inherently greater mobility than silicon, which...

    02/09/2017 - 11:00 Materials, Computing
  • Feature

    When a nearby star goes supernova, scientists will be ready

    Almost every night that the constellation Orion is visible, physicist Mark Vagins steps outside to peer at a reddish star at the right shoulder of the mythical figure. “You can see the color of Betelgeuse with the naked eye. It’s very striking, this red, red star,” he says. “It may not be in my lifetime, but one of these days, that star is going to explode.”

    With a radius about 900 times...

    02/08/2017 - 08:00 Astronomy, Physics
  • News

    Long-lasting mental health isn’t normal

    Abnormal is the new normal in mental health.

    A small, poorly understood segment of the population stays mentally healthy from age 11 to 38, a new study of New Zealanders finds. Everyone else encounters either temporary or long-lasting mental disorders.

    Only 171 of 988 participants, or 17 percent, experienced no anxiety disorders, depression or other mental ailments from late...

    02/07/2017 - 12:58 Psychology, Mental Health
  • Context

    In 20th century, astronomers opened their minds to gazillions of galaxies

    WASHINGTON — Before astronomers could discover the expansion of the universe, they had to expand their minds.

    When the 20th century began, astronomers not only didn’t know the universe was expanding, they didn’t even care.

    “Astronomers in the late 19th century and the very start of the 20th century were very little interested in what we would call the broader universe or its...

    02/02/2017 - 07:00 Astronomy, History of Science
  • Awards

    20162016 Folio: AwardsBest single article, Consumer, Science, Gene Drives Unleashed, Tina Hesman Saey (Dec. 12, 2015 issue).Best series of articles, Consumer, Science, The discovery of gravitational waves. Physicists Detect Gravitational Waves – LIGO experiment reports first detection of spacetime vibrations, opening new window to the cosmos.Listening for Gravity Waves – News from Advanced LIGO...
    01/30/2017 - 18:54
  • News

    Snooze patterns vary across cultures, opening eyes to evolution of sleep

    Hunter-gatherers and farming villagers who live in worlds without lightbulbs or thermostats sleep slightly less at night than smartphone-toting city slickers, researchers say.

    “Contrary to conventional wisdom, people in societies without electricity do not sleep more than those in industrial societies like ours,” says UCLA psychiatrist and sleep researcher Jerome Siegel, who was not...

    01/27/2017 - 13:42 Anthropology, Evolution
  • Science & the Public

    Trump administration clampdowns on research agencies worry scientists

    Just days into the Trump administration, alarm bells are ringing in the scientific community amid confusing and whiplashing reports of gag orders and funding freezes at the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other federal agencies.

    Various on-again, off-again directives range from putting a hold on tweeting (mostly still on) to banning the sharing of...

    01/26/2017 - 16:00 Science & Society
  • 50 Years Ago

    50 years ago, methadone made a rosy debut

    Heroin cure works 

    [T]he drug methadone appears to have fulfilled its promise as an answer to heroin addiction. Some 276 hard-core New York addicts … have lost their habits and none have returned to heroin — a 100 percent success rating. Methadone, a synthetic narcotic, acts by blocking the euphoric effect of opiates. Addicts thus get nothing from heroin and feel no desire to take it. — ...

    01/26/2017 - 07:00 Health
  • Feature

    Some lucky birds escaped dino doomsday

    The asteroid strike (or was it the roiling volcanoes?) that triggered dino doomsday 66 million years ago also brought an avian apocalypse. Birds had evolved by then, but only some had what it took to survive.

    Biologists now generally accept birds as a kind of dinosaur, just as people are a kind of mammal. Much of what we think of as birdlike traits — bipedal stance, feathers, wishbones...

    01/25/2017 - 14:30 Evolution, Animals